• International Telemetering Conference Proceedings, Volume 19 (1983)

      International Foundation for Telemetering, 1983-10
    • AN ANGULAR VELOCIMETER FOR AEROSPACE APPLICATIONS

      Whaley, P. W.; University of Nebraska (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1983-10)
      Low-level broad-band angular vibration measurement applications are continually developing. This has generated a pressing need for a low-level angular vibration sensor capable of measuring micro-radians at frequencies from 0 to 10kHz, with a total size of the sensor on the order of a cubic centimeter. The device described in this paper has potential for satisfying such a need. Only three design parameters are required to address the minimum sensitivity level, and alternate designs with dynamic ranges and durability similar to piezoelectric accelerometers could be developed capable of measuring angles down to 10^-6 radians. Since the device is based on measuring accelerations using piezoelectric crystals, linearity, dynamic range, hysteresis, and stability qualifications, as well as cost of production are anticipated on the order of conventional piezoelectric accelerometers.
    • REVIEW PLANS FOR NEW CENTER FOR MAGNETIC RECORDING RESEARCH AT UC SAN DIEGO

      Rudee, M.Lea; University of California (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1983-10)
      In order to meet the acute national need for a major research and teaching effort in magnetic recording technology, the University of California, San Diego has established a Center for Magnetic Recording Research. At the core of the Center will be four faculty whose interdisciplinary research interests are in magnetic recording. Four endowed professorships will be used to attract this core faculty. The Center will also include other faculty at UCSD and throughout the University of California. UCSD has committed land and $1 million and the Regents of the University of California an additional $1 million to be matched by $3 million of industrial funds to construct a building to house the Center. Industry will also provide some research equipment and partial research support for five years. It is intended that the Center will have national visibility and achieve international leadership in the field.
    • INTEGRATED REALTIME SOFTWARE FOR BOTH AIRBORNE FLIGHT TEST SYSTEMS AND PCM GROUND STATIONS

      Trover, W. F.; Associate Director of Advanced Systems (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1983-10)
      Flight test activities can be completed quicker if the test engineers can evaluate test data in realtime on-board the aircraft or at the PCM ground station. Teledyne Controls is developing a software package for several customers that provides realtime EU data in several formats. Data presented to the test engineer includes: stacked or overlayed scrolling EU curves, limit exceedance tests and alarm generation, tabular EU data presentations and operator requested hardcopy of CRT presentations supplemented by the classical raw data strip chart recordings. Incorporated into this software are facilities permitting semi-automatic calibration of sensors installed in the aircraft during preflight operations as well as generation of tape headers for automatic PCM tape reading by the ground station. Other features include semi-automatic processing of sensor calibration data gathered in the calibration laboratory for entry into the ground station’s data base, and a software/hardware link coupling the data reduction software in the PCM ground station to the generation, loading and test of the data cycle map in the airborne PCM system.
    • TRUTH TRAJECTORY ESTIMATION FOR GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM USER EQUIPMENT TESTS

      Lt.Col. Kruczynski, Leonard R.; U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1983-10)
      Testing of NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (GPS) user equipment at the U.S. Amy Proving Ground (YPG) requires accurate position and velocity information. GPS position accuracy is 15 meters spherical error probable and velocity accuracy is .1m/sec RMS per axis. Proper evaluation of GPS user equipment requires position and velocity information more accurate than the equipment under test. YPG users laser trackers to develop a real-time estimate (RTE) of the trajectory. Independent analyses show that the RTE accuracy is about 3m and that velocity accuracy is about .25/m sec overall. This paper describes the development of the RTE starting from the raw laser measurements to the calculation of position and velocity in a local coordinate frame. Included is a description of the filter. The paper also discusses the methods used to verify the accuracy of the RTE.
    • PRELIMINARY TEST RESULTS OF THE ELECTRONIC SWITCHING SPHERICAL ARRAY ANTENNA

      Kudrna, Ken; Ball Aerospace Systems Division (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1983-10)
      An Electronic Switching Spherical Array (ESSA) Antenna has been developed for low obiting spacecraft requiring medium gain (+13 dBic) transmit and receive relay capability through the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite Systems (TDRSS). This 145 radiating element antenna is steered with a microprocessor controller by selecting arrays of 12 elements at a time. Approximately 1800 beams can be selected for near hemispherical coverage. The primary method for evaluating this antenna is a composite Radiation Distribution Plot (RDP).
    • SOLID STATE TECHNOLOGY APPLICABLE TO TRANSMITTERS

      Woo, Arthur; Bardai, Zahir; Leverich, Lyle (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1983-10)
    • LOW COST, LIGHTWEIGHT, SINGLE AXIS TRACKING SYSTEM FOR UNMANNED VEHICLE APPLICATION

      Sullivan, Arthur; Turner, William C.; Electro Magnetic Processes, Inc. (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1983-10)
      Recent events in the Falkland Islands, and in Israel/Lebanon, have made the tactical use of unmanned airborne vehicle systems a practical reality The control of the unmanned vehicles requires a radio uplink, a downlink for vehicle position determination, for telemetering monitored events and functions, and, in some instances, transmission of television or other information. While for some situations the ground antenna can be fixed, the majority of today’s applications require a steerable antenna. This is dictated by the fact that a high gain (and therefore, narrow beam) antenna is required for maximum range, and that for most scenarios, vehicle position must be determined. The increasing use of unmanned vehicles indicates the need for a low-cost tracking antenna system. Use of the tracking antenna in transportable and/or mobile systems calls for a lightweight system. A two-axis antenna, in addition to being heavy, is more than twice the cost of a single-axis tracking antenna system. Slant range of the vehicle is determined by the use of a ranging tone and ground range is determined by comparing altitude data telemetered back from an on-board altimeter with slant range. Complete positional data are obtained given the ground range and the bearing angle from the singleaxis tracking antenna. A microprocessor-based antenna control unit allows all systematic errors of the antenna system to be calibrated out of the angle data. A binomially fed, linearly polarized, folded pillbox horn antenna, having extremely low sidelobes, permits wide angle acquisition, and high elevation angle tracking without introducing bearing angle error. The use of graphite fiber materials for antenna and rotator construction provides savings both in cost and weight. A newly developed lightweight and low-cost single-axis tracking antenna that utilizes all these techniques is described in this paper.
    • ADVANCED TT&C FOR THE AIR FORCE SATELLITE CONTROL FACILITY CONCEPTUAL OVERVIEW

      Carroll, James T.; The Aerospace Corporation (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1983-10)
      The Department of Defense will be moving their essential space resources into the EHF spectrum which, together with new signal structures, will counter the impacts of jamming, nuclear effects, and electronic intelligence intercept. The Air Force Satellite Control Facility (AFSCF) project for incorporating the new Satellite Data Link Standards (SDLS) into its existing antenna and communication network is described. Also, the signal structure concepts, system architecture, EHF user programs, interoperability factors, and finally, implementation plans. Taken together, these factors will implement a new SDLS Military Standard for space links.
    • DEVELOPING COMPUTERIZED, MOBILE TELEMETRY DATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS

      Cunningham, Mike; New Mexico State University (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1983-10)
      In today’s world, the fixed telemetry ground station is giving way to the mobile telemetry ground station. More and more systems are being developed to take advantage of mobility, allowing the ground station to be deployed to the testing area. To accomplish this, the Physical Science Laboratory (PSL) has developed methods to design mobile facilities to house modern, computerized telemetry stations that not only ensure equipment survivability, but also take into account the ergonomic considerations that are vital to operator performance.
    • USING THE STD BUS FOR ENCODER/DECODER SYSTEMS ABOARD A HIGH-ALTITUDE BALLOON PLATFORM

      Willis, Jim; Stabilized High Altitude Research Platform Physical Science Laboratory New Mexico State University Las Cruces (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1983-10)
      The Physical Science Laboratory (PSL) is developing a balloon-launched platform that will support a wide range of high-altitude projects. The Stabilized High Altitude Research Platform (SHARP) will house several on-board microprocessor-based subsystems to provide telemetry, command, and navigation data. Support for a wide variety of scientific experiments requires versatile electronic subsystems aboard the platform. Using the STD bus as a building block component, the Laboratory has designed and fabricated such subsystems. The STD bus, a standard interface throughout the computer industry, was chosen for the design because of its availability, ruggedness, versatility, and wide selection of compatible, off-the-shelf components.
    • SYSTEM ENGINEERING USING “TOY” COMPUTERS

      Mitchell, Steven W.; Sheets, K. Yvonne; ARGOSystems, Inc. (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1983-10)
      The current proliteration of microcomputers and software provides the system engineer and program manager a useful set of tools that can be adapted to support and enhance the program management effort. The functions that can be implemented effectively include scheduling, word processing, budgeting, limited data base applications, requirements tracing, document control, electronic mail/bulletin boards, and the tracking of contractual details. This paper describes strategies and architectures useful fo r implementing microcomputers into the program office environment. Also discussed is a software development methodology specifically tailored for the use at microcomputer applications software. * K. Yvonne Sheets is employed by Space Research, Inc., 440 Redondo Ave., Suite 202, Long Beach, Ca. 90814, and is under contract to ARGOSystams, Inc.
    • SPACE SHUTTLE INFRARED PYROMETRY

      Patton, Victor V. C.; Martin Marietta Corporation; Denver Aerospace (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1983-10)
      In March of 1982 4700 temperature measurements were made of the space shuttle lower surface during its entry from orbit. These measurements were taken in less than 7 ms from a distance of 52 km (32 miles) by an electro-optical “pyrometric” system aboard the NASA C141 Kuiper Infrared observatory. The total system is described briefly with the detector amplifiers, system grounding and noise described in detail.
    • GPS TRANSLATOR APPLICATION CONSIDERATIONS FOR TEST RANGES

      McCONNELL, JOHN B.; PICKETT, ROBERT B.; Western Space and Missile Center; Federal Electric Corporation (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1983-10)
      Tracking system implementations based on the retransmission of Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite signals from a test vehicle with signal tracking and trajectory estimation performed by ground-based range equipment are addressed. Two types of vehicle-borne frequency translators are described, techniques for correcting translator local oscillator error are proposed and potential techniques for receiving, recording and relaying translator signals using IRIG standard telemetry equipment are suggested.
    • HIGH RESOLUTION DIGITAL DATA TRANSITION ANALYSIS AND TESTING

      Petit, Richard D.; Kode Inc., a Subsidiary of Odetics Inc. (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1983-10)
      The need for margin analysis in high density digital data storage systems is established. A review of margin analysis techniques is presented. This review includes a discussion of time interval analysis and a series of instruments which have evolved as a means of performing this analysis. Emphasis is given to a high resolution (1 nanosecond) statistically oriented embodiment of such an instrument.
    • TECHNIQUES FOR ACQUIRING DIGITAL DATA FROM INTELLIGENT SUBSYSTEMS

      Gilje, Harold B.; Nicolais, Raymond F.; Aydin Vector Division (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1983-10)
      There is an ever-increasing need for intelligent sub-systems onboard airborne and ground vehicles. With this intelligence comes asynchronous bus communications under the control of various industry standards and specifications. As a result, two telecommunications needs have developed; from a telemetering viewpoint, that of acquiring data from the various intelligent sources and time-division multiplexing that data with classic analog instrumentation, and, from an intravehicle communications viewpoint, that of providing a means for transfer of information between two dissimilar sub-systems. A systematic breakdown of the necessary elements to link, synchronize, sort, interpret, store, merge and control such data is examined. Proven approaches to handling data from both standard (ARINC, MIL-STD-1553, IEEE-488, etc.) and specialized subsystems is overviewed from an instrumentation perspective.
    • AUTOMATIC GAIN RANGING AMPLIFIER

      Talmadge, Richard E.; Liron, Emanuel; AFWAL-FIBG; Aydin Vector Division (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1983-10)
      The increasing complexity of Air Force aircraft and systems has created a demand for the collection of greater amounts of more accurate, higher dynamic range test data to solve dynamics related problems. The problems presented by higher volume can be resolved by making use of a time sharing Pulse Coded Modulation formatting technique. To meet demands for high dynamic range, the need is apparent for a device which “siphons” the wide dynamic range test data to a range which is compatible with the recording device. The Automatic Gain Ranging Amplifier performs this task and that of increasing the system’s signal to noise ratio. The AGRA has seven gain options from -12 dB to 60 dB (-12 dB is a one step 12 dB attenuation) in 12 dB steps. Gain is controlled by an internal peak detector or by an external (CMOS compatible) processor. Following the amplifier is a four rolloff frequency, six pole Butterworth low pass filter. The AGRA senses the output measurement and automatically adjusts the gain to be within the required recording levels. In this manner, a large number of measurement devices (thermocouples, strain gauges, etc.) whose output swings vary over a large range can be made compatible with a single recording device.
    • LOW-POWER FAULT-TOLERANT MICROPROCESSOR-BASED DISTRIBUTED ARCHITECTURE FOR ON-BOARD SIGNAL PROCESSING

      Haas, W. H.; Liao, H. H.; Schoknecht, W. E.; Rockwell International (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1983-10)
      Numerous future space-based systems are being conceived that will require the on-board processing of a volume of data many orders of magnitude greater than the current state-ofthe- art. Such systems must in addition be extremely low power and autonomously fault recoverable. This paper describes a microprocessor-based distributed architecture that has been evolving as a solution to this problem. This proposed architecture features three subarchitectures: synchronous pipeline, dedicated-channel microprocessor array, and multiplebus oriented microcomputer array; as well as internal data compression, distributed control and self testing, and a building block approach to system implementation. Emphasized is the roll of microprocessors in this architecture and the challenge of reducing the overhead required by fault-tolerant processing.
    • NETWORK CONTROL OF SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS

      Aronson, Michael H.; Ford Aerospace & Communications Corporation (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1983-10)
      This paper provides an overview of network control concepts applied to satellite communications systems. The term network control is defined, the rationale for employing network control is discussed, and the techniques for controlling a satellite communications system are described. Future trends in the technology are identified.
    • U.S. ARMY YUMA PROVING GROUND TELEMETRY SUPPORT CAPABILITIES WITH APPLICATIONS TO GPS TESTING

      Bottone, Anthony G.; Electronic Section, STEYP-MDP-E U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1983-10)
      This paper presents an overview of U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground Telemetry acquisition facilities as they relate to developmental tests of the GPS system. These systems utilize the latest state-of-the-art in telemetry tracking systems, receivers, and employ a unique scheme for frequency and space diversity combination and signal selection. The telemetry systems presently used can accomodate two simultaneous aircraft in various parts of the range. Through acquisition of telemetry and subsequent reduction, actual realtime differences in X, Y, Z location between three station laser derived position solution and GPS satellite solution can be displayed and recorded. In addition, a summary of latest facility expansion involved in the enhanced support of the GPS testing at the 1600 square mile U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground will be presented.