• 24-BIT FLIGHT TEST DATA RECORDING FORMAT

      Mills, H. L.; Turver, K. D.; Boeing Commercial Airplane Group (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1991-11)
      Boeing Commercial Airplane Group’s Flight Test Engineering organization is developing a new test data recording format to be used on the new model 777 airplane. ARINC 429, ARINC 629 and IRIG PCM data will be formatted for recording test data. The need to support a variety of data recorders, and three types of data, mandate the development of a new recording format. The format Flight Test chose is a variation of IRIG Standard 106-86, Chapter 8. The data from each channel is treated as a data packet, including time and channel ID, and then multiplexed into 24 bits. This allows a time accuracy of 10 microseconds and a minimum latency caused by multiplexing.
    • ADVANCED DIGITAL DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM

      Malchodi, L. A.; Boeing Commercial Airplane Group (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1991-11)
      An ARINC 429 data acquisition system has been developed by Flight Test Engineering for the Boeing Commercial Airplane Group. Traditionally, acquired ARINC 429 data is stored in the acquisition system and periodically sampled for recording. This paper describes a system which acquires data from many different ARINC 429 digital data buses and records that data as soon as it is has been transmitted on the bus.
    • ADVANCED ORBITING SYSTEMS FRONT END

      Hand, Sarah; Kram, Howard; Speciale, Nicholas; NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1991-11)
      NASA’s Space Station and Earth Observing System (EOS) will be utilizing the Customer Data Operations Systems (CDOS) for data acquisition, capture, and production processing. The Advanced Orbiting Systems (AOS) Front End System being designed at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is a prototype front end system which is designed to demonstrate the core front end functions required in the CDOS system in a realistic data processing environment. The overall goal is to provide a low cost environment for evaluating and verifying AOS and CDOS requirements before the actual operational systems are built. Additionally, the prototype will provide a data transport mechanism to move data to prototype production data systems and to other processing facilities via the new NASCOM II system. This paper describes the overall architecture of the AOS Front End (AFE) system, its core processing functions and performance requirements, and the possible implementation architectures and solutions being developed to handle key required AOS services
    • ADVANCED TELEMETRY TRACKING SERVO SYSTEM

      HART, MICHAEL JAMES; INSTRUMENTATION DIRECTORATE, WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE, NM (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1991-11)
      The primary objective of the Advanced Telemetry Tracking System Integration and Development program at WSMR was the development and evaluation of an advanced, almost totally digital servo tracking and control system. This was satisfied by replacing the aging analog servo tracking and control system in one of WSMR’s seven Transportable Telemetry Acquisition Systems (TTAS) with a Digital Control Unit (DCU), an Antenna Control Unit (ACU), and other related equipment, and then evaluating the performance of the resultant digital tracking system, referred to as the Advanced TTAS (TTAS-A). The ACU is the primary interface between the operator and the DCU. Through the ACU, the TTAS-A operator has independent control over each pedestal axis (elevation and azimuth) involving the selection of tracking mode and servo bandwidth. The DCU reports various servo system status and warning conditions back to the operator through the ACU. In this paper, a discussion of the TTAS-A servo system, with emphasis upon hardware external to the DCU, is presented. This includes the operation of servo position and rate loops, system status and warning conditions, and a description of the operator-to-system interface via the ACU display and control functions.
    • ADVANCED TELEMETRY TRACKING SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT AT WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE

      Sharp, Phillip D.; Data Systems Division (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1991-11)
      Early in the 1980s White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) began studying the problem of updating the Telemetry Tracking Systems (TTS) used to support test range missions. The information and equipment available at that time indicated that very little technology advancement had occurred in the area of TTS. Because the TTS usually have a long service life, it was imperative that the new or updated systems be as good as the state-of-the-art in todays technology could produce. Because of the lack of technology advancements, it was evident that drastic measures would be required to achieve the objectives of the update effort. These findings resulted in a program called the Advanced Telemetry Tracking System Integration and Development (ATTSID). Its objective was to determine if it was possible to apply advanced computer technology to the solution of servosystem problems characteristic in most TTS. This paper and three related papers, The Advanced Telemetry Tracking Servosystem; An Automated Testing System for a Telemetry Tracking System; and The Microcomputer-based Digital Controller for the Advanced Telemetry Tracking System; document the objectives, design considerations, fabrication and evaluation of a prototype TTS. It utilizes a dedicated computer system to control, compensate the servo position loop, and provide automated testing of the servo and RF receiving systems. This computer system was installed and evaluated in one of the WSMR Transportable Telemetry Acquisition Systems (TTAS) for evaluation and refinement of the system. The results of this program will determine the evolution of TTS and extend the use of computer technology to providing more reliable and accurate telemetry tracking support of test range operations.
    • ADVANCEMENTS IN SUBMINIATURE TELEMETRY TECHNOLOGY

      Murphey, Robert A.; Eglin Air Force Base, Florida (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1991-11)
      This paper describes the progress made by the Wright Laboratory Armament Directorate Instrumentation Branch in developing Subminiature Instrumentation Technologies. These advancements will be explained relative to the overall scope of Subminiature Instrumentation efforts. The goal of these efforts is a DoD depot capability to provide low cost, non-intrusive telemetry instrumentation for any weapon system.
    • AIRBORNE DATA ACQUISITION and RELAY SYSTEM

      Netzer, Allan (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1991-11)
      The Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC), 6545th Test Group, is the Air Force center of expertise for Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) test and evaluation (T&E). To facilitate this mission, the 6545th Test Group developed three NC-130 Surrogate Carrier Launch Platform (SCLP) aircraft for UAV test support. The SCLP aircraft support various test functions including avionics testing, captive-carriage, and launch of UAVs and missiles. The system can support concept validation and early Developmental Test and Evaluation (DT&E) without requiring the operational launch platform, freeing these critical assets from test support. The SCLP aircraft use a palletized “roll-on/roll-off” approach to increase test support flexibility and decrease test costs. Capabilities include airborne command and control, flight termination, telemetry tracking, recording, relay of in-flight test vehicle data, and engineering test stations for airborne data analysis and test control. The SCLP can captive-carry, launch, and operate a test article out of line of sight of range ground stations. SCLP can display engineering data and relay the data to a Mission Control Center (MCC). Additionally, the SCLP permits autonomous operation on undeveloped airspace or supplements capabilities at existing facilities. Early SCLP configurations were used during concept validation of the air-launched Tacit Rainbow missile, while later variations supported several efforts, including classified programs. This paper describes the telemetry-tracking and relay capabilities of the SCLP using the Airborne Data Acquisition and Relay System (ADARS) station. The ADARS uses a combination of tracking and omni-directional antennas to acquire, track, record, and retransmit telemetry data. The combination of two directional tracking antennas and diversity combining of the received signals enables the system to reliably acquire test vehicle data at relatively low signal levels or with high fade rates. The system proved very versatile and was modified to support various special project requirements. The system is currently configured to receive and retransmit telemetry data up to a rate of 1.92 Megabits per second (Mbps).
    • AIRBORNE/SHIPBORNE PSK TELEMETRY DATA LINK

      CARLSON, JOHN R.; SCHMIDT, ARLEN; Aydin Computer and Monitor Division; Intera Systems, Ltd. (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1991-11)
      This paper describes the design considerations and methodology applied to solve the practical problems posed in the creation of a high bit rate telemetry relay system and specifically the techniques implemented to enhance signal to noise performance under adverse operational conditions.
    • APPLICATIONS AND DESCRIPTION OF THE 9000SE PCM SIMULATOR FOR SIMULATION OF PCM DATA

      Conell, David; Terametrix Systems International (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1991-11)
      This paper will discuss the needs and requirements of a PCM encoder data simulator. The 9000SE PCM encoder data simulator allows for the simulation of flight PCM data as well as bit error rate (BER) test patterns designed for link stress analysis. In addition, the open architecture of the 9000SE as an ISA bus device allows for the incorporation of the simulator into application specific realtime systems.
    • ARCHITECTURE FOR A NEXT GENERATION TELEMETRY AND DATA ACQUISITION BUS

      DAWSON, D.M.; VEDA SYSTEMS INCORPORATED (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1991-11)
      During the requirements definition process for a new telemetry and data acquisition product, Veda Systems engineers had the opportunity to examine the requirements for the ideal bus architecture to support future needs. Design goals and requirements were solicited from major users in flight test, space ground station data monitoring and command applications, and C41, as well as Veda’s own engineers. The process resulted in a bus architecture design which could potentially set the standard for the next generation of telemetry and data acquisition systems. This paper outlines the design goals selected and the thought process that yielded the goals in an attempt to promote advancement of current bus design approaches and increased availability of standard architectures and operating environments.
    • AUTOMATED ACOUSTIC DETECTION AND PROCESSING FOR THE ADVANCED RANGE INSTRUMENTATION AIRCRAFT SONOBUOY MISSILE IMPACT LOCATION SYSTEM

      Schaeffer, Paul J.; ARIA Programs Division (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1991-11)
      Recent advances in acoustic detection and array processing have led to a new, state of the art, Sonobuoy Missile Impact Location System (SMILS). This system was developed for the 4950th Test Wing by E-Systems and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory to support ballistic missile testing in broad ocean areas. The hardware and software required to perform the SMILS mission were developed in two different areas: 1) The flight system, installed aboard the Advanced Range Instrumentation Aircraft (ARIA), which provides everything necessary to guide the aircraft to the target area of Deep Ocean Transponders (DOTs), deploy sonobuoys, recover signals from the sonobuoys, and to process the recovered signals. The sonobuoy positions and impact locations of reentry vehicles are determined aboard the aircraft in real-time by telemetering the acoustic signals sent from the sonobuoys via Radio Frequency (RF) link to the aircraft. These acoustic signals are also recorded on analog tape in the aircraft. 2) The Post Mission Analysis System (PMAS), located at the 4950th Test Wing, processes the analog tapes recorded by the aircraft to do more sophisticated Processing than that performed on the aircraft, providing higher resolution of impact times and positions. This paper addressees the theory of PMAS operation and the specific approach used to perform automated acoustic detection of both narrow and wide band acoustic signals. It also addressees the processing technique employed to determine sonobuoy navigation and impact scoring.
    • AN AUTOMATED TESTING SYSTEM FOR A TELEMETRY TRACKING SYSTEM

      MARSH, TED A.; INSTRUMENTATION DIRECTORATE (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1991-11)
      White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) has developed an Advanced Transportable Telemetry Acquisition System (TTAS-A) which utilizes a dedicated computer system for antenna control. The Automated Testing System (ATS), an integral part of this system, is the subject of this paper. The ATS consists of hardware and software designed to provide fully automated testing of the radio frequency (RF) and servo subsystems for validation purposes. The RF subsystem tests are designed to evaluate, measure, and display RF performance parameters such as receiving system Figure of Merit and RF system sensitivity. The servo subsystem tests are designed to evaluate and display the stability and response characteristics of the servo subsystem. Tests are accessed via a keyboard, and extensive use of menus makes the software easy to learn and use. The test equipment is controlled entirely by the computer, and hard copies of all test results are available on the system printer.
    • THE BRIDGE FUNCTION TELEMETRY SYSTEM

      Qishan, Zhang; BEIJING UNIVERSITY OF AERONAUTICS AND ASTRONAUTICS (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1991-11)
      Based on the theory of orthogonality, two orthogonal multiplex systems called frequency division multiplexing (FDM) and time division multiplexing (TDM) have long been developed. Therefore, many people tend to think that these two systems represent the ONLY two multiplexing methods that satisfy the orthogonal condition. However, after years of research, we've discovered a new kind of orthogonal functions called Bridge functions. The Bridge functions have the every promise of being the basis for constructing an entirely new kind of telemetry system, which has been named as sequency division multiplexing (SDM). Since the Bridge functions are the mathematical basis of the new telemetry system, we will give a summary of the Bridge functions at first. We have successfully constructed an experimental prototype called BAM-FM system in our laboratory. The main ideas, block diagram, operational principles, and technical problems are discussed in this paper. All our work has proved that SDM has not only research interests, but also practical value.
    • THE BRIDGE FUNCTION TELEMETRY SYSTEM

      Qishan, Zhang; BEIJING UNIVERSITY OF AERONAUTICS AND ASTRONAUTICS (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1991-11)
      Based on the theory of orthogonality, two orthogonal multiplex systems called frequency division multiplexing(FDM) and time division multiplexing(TDM) have long been developed. Therefore, many people tend to think that these two systems represent the ONLY two multiplexing methods that satisfy the orthogonal condition. However, after years of research, we've discovered a new kind of orthogonal functions called Bridge functions. The Bridge functions have the every promise of being the basis for constructing an entirely new kind of telemetry system, which has been named as sequency division multiplexing(SDM). Since the Bridge functions are the mathematical basis of the new telemetry system, we will give a summary of the Bridge functions at first. We have successfully constructed an experimental prototype called BAM-FM system in our laboratory. The main ideas, block diagram, operational principles, and technical problems are discussed in this paper. All our work has proved that SDM has not only research interests, but also practical value.
    • CARRIER PHASE MODULATION USING DIRECT DIGITAL SYNTHESIS FOR AN S-BAND UPLINK

      Burgess, George; Murphy, William; Stanford Telecommunications, Inc. (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1991-11)
      Phase modulation has traditionally been performed in analog hardware. A new product will be described that implements this function using a phase-modulating NCO IC. The modulating signal is sampled and added digitally to the phase of the carrier generated by the NCO. This method produces an output spectrum with highly accurate modulation control, low spur levels and minimal distortion. The effects of generating sampled phase-modulated signals will be described. The selection of the clock and output frequencies are critical to ensuring a clean spectrum. Resulting output spectra are shown.
    • CHART RECORDERS EVOLVE INTO DATA MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

      Smith, Grant M.; Western Graphtec, Inc. (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1991-11)
      A synopsis of the very recent evolution of telemetry chart recorders from “closed” chart paper output devices to powerful “open” Data Management Systems. A Data Management System (DMS) is defined as one which incorporates a video screen for waveform preview and monitoring, direct connection of hard or optical disk via SCSI for real-time data archiving, and DR11 digital interfacing. The DMS concept of providing real-time waveform monitoring independent of hard copy recording is discussed, as well as the capabilities of the hard copy recorder. The realities of budget shortfalls makes wholesale system upgrades to eliminate DAC’s entirely difficult at best. These concerns—and a potential remedy: a DMS which accepts any mix of analog and digital waveforms—are reviewed. Objectives: How DMS’s can be integrated with existing telemetry systems, encompass the functionality of conventional recorders and add new capabilities, with an emphasis on how data can be digitally pre-formatted in real-time, simplifying—or even eliminating—post-mission reduction and analysis. A demonstration of how a video display allows real-time trace viewing—a major weakness of conventional thermal array recorders.
    • COMMON AIRBORNE INSTRUMENTATION SYSTEM (CAIS)

      Faulstich, Raymond J.; Naval Air Test Center (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1991-11)
      In March, 1991 the Naval Air Test Center awarded a design, development and limited production contract to SCI Technology, Inc. for a Department of Defense (DoD) Common Airborne Instrumentation System (CAIS). This system is being developed to meet the flight test needs of the Air Force, Army and Navy into the 21 century. st The CAIS will be a time-division multiplexed data acquisition system comprised of a standard modular complement of hardware and software. These systems will be used on both existing and future aircraft. CAIS will not be airframe or weapon system dependent nor will its use be restricted to any Test and Evaluation activity. This paper describes the CAIS system as specified and proposed for implementation.
    • A COMPACT 500 MS/SEC WIDEBAND SNAPSHOT RECORDER/WORKSTATION

      Anderson, J. L.; ESL Incorporated (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1991-11)
      This paper describes the design of the TCM Plus, an integrated 500 MSample/second snapshot recording system that achieves high performance in a compact, modular implementation. The system can record and playback analog and digital signals at sample rates from 10 KHz - 500 MHZ with RAM-based storage of up to 256 MBytes. High density multi-layer circuit card designs and custom and semi-custom chips were required to meet the physical size design objective of a 7" high rack mount chassis for the memory unit. A highly graphical computer with standard busses was imbedded as the system controller, resulting in the capability to tightly couple wideband acquisition with signal processing application software which can turn the system into an ultrahigh performance signal processing workstation.
    • COMPLEX FORMAT SYNCHRONIZATION AND DECOMMUTATION

      Thom, Gary A.; Aydin Computer and Monitor Division (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1991-11)
      Today's advanced commutation systems and on-board computers present a difficult challenge to many existing ground station systems. This paper describes various complex telemetry formats generated by these airborne systems and further describes methods for synchronizing and decommutating these formats.
    • DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR A MODERN TELEMETRY PROCESSING AND DISPLAY SYSTEM

      KNIGHT, PAUL D.; Pacific Missile Test Center (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1991-11)
      Designing and fielding a telemetry processing and display system in today’s environment of rapidly changing requirements is an imposing task. This paper delineates some design considerations that will allow a system designer to adapt or modify a system as required in order to stay abreast of constantly changing telemetry requirements. A description of how these design considerations were used in implementing the Telemetry Processing System at the Pacific Missile Test Center is then presented.