• MINIATURE PENETRATOR (MINPEN) ACCELERATION RECORDER DEVELOPMENT AND TEST

      Franco, R. J.; Platzbecker, M. R.; Sandia National Laboratories (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1998-10)
      The Telemetry Technology Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories actively develops and tests acceleration recorders for penetrating weapons. This new acceleration recorder (MinPen) utilizes a microprocessor-based architecture for operational flexibility while maintaining electronics and packaging techniques developed over years of penetrator testing. MinPen has been demonstrated to function in shock environments up to 20,000 Gs. The MinPen instrumentation development has resulted in a rugged, versatile, miniature acceleration recorder and is a valuable tool for penetrator testing in a wide range of applications.
    • A MOBILE RANGE SYSTEM TO TRACK TELEMETRY FROM A HIGH-SPEED INSTRUMENTATION PACKAGE

      Leung, Joseph; Aoyagi, Michio; Billings, Donald; Hoy, Herbert; Lin, Mei; Shigemoto, Fred; NASA (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1998-10)
      As renewal interest in building vehicles based on hypersonic technologies begin to emerge again, test ranges anticipating in supporting flight research of these vehicles will face a set of engineering problems. Most fundamentals of these will be to track and gather error free telemetry from the vehicles in flight. The first series of vehicles will likely be reduced-scale models that restrict the locations and geometric shapes of the telemetry antennas. High kinetic heating will further limit antenna design and construction. Consequently, antennas radiation patterns will be sub-optimal, showing lower gains and detrimental nulls. A mobile system designed to address the technical issues above will be described. The use of antenna arrays, spatial diversity and a hybrid tracking system using optical and electronic techniques to obtain error free telemetry in the present of multipath will be presented. System tests results will also be presented.
    • MULTI-USER SATELLITE TRACKING NETWORK SCHEDULING

      Glim, Carl; Universal Space Network, Inc. (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1998-10)
      The recent proliferation of Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) science, earth resources, and global communication satellites requires a significant number of ground stations for support. A network of satellite tracking ground stations with the ability to support multiple users and communicate with multiple satellites requires a robust scheduling and conflict resolution system. This paper describes an automated scheduling implementation for managing such a commercial, multi-user, multiple satellite, ground station network.
    • A Narrowband Model For Aeronautical Telemetry Channels

      Rice, Michael; Welling, Kenneth; Brigham Young University (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1998-10)
      This paper presents a narrowband channel model appropriate for modeling multipath interference in aeronautical telemetry applications. This model uses a simplified version of Bello’s aeronautical fading channel model [1] with the following three parameters: the specular to direct power ratio T, the direct to diffuse power ratio K and the relative Doppler shift of the specular component. Data taken from Patuxent River NAWC, Edwards AFB and White Sands Missile Range demonstrate that the model is a reasonably accurate statistical representation of the envelope (and power) fluctuations observed in the data. The model works well for those cases where a dominate line-of-sight signal component exists, as well as for those cases where the power in the specular reflections is on the order of the power in the line-of-sight component.
    • NEW GENERATION COMMAND RECEIVER FOR SATELLITE USING BENEFITS OF DIGITAL PROCESSING.

      Monica, G. Della; Tonello, E.; ALCATEL (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1998-10)
      Presentation of Alcatel Espace last studies and developments regarding TT&C receiver Products for satellite. This document lays on 3 parts: · a technical point of view showing digital demodulation principles used (base band recovery, analytical head, PM or FM demodulation) and their related offered possibilities(digital controlling loop, lock status detection, jammer detection,....) · a technology/design description · a synthesis showing performance and results
    • A NEW GENERATION OF DATA RECORDERS BASED ON DLT TECHNOLOGY

      Thames, Fred; Avalon Electronics Ltd (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1998-10)
      As the performance of inexpensive commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) data storage devices continues to increase, the temptation to use them as the basis for data capture products for military and industrial applications becomes ever more compelling. For example, the Digital Linear Tape (DLT) format now offers a 270 Gigabits per cassette capacity at a sustained transfer rate of 40 Mbits/s – performance which would have cost tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars per system just a few years ago. But to transplant such a device from its benign office habitat into a data capture product which will function reliably and consistently in a wide range of field and platform environments is an engineering task fully as difficult and complex as designing an environmentally robust recorder from scratch. This paper discusses the problems which typically have to be overcome; environmental protection, reliability, data integrity, power supplies, software issues, control and data interfacing, etc., citing practical examples of analog and digital DLT-based data recorders which are now entering service for telemetry, intelligence gathering, anti-submarine warfare and related applications
    • A NEW GENERATION OF RECORDING TECHNOLOGY THE SOLID STATE RECORDER

      Jensen, Peter; Thacker, Christopher; Merlin Engineering Works (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1998-10)
      The Test & Evaluation community is starting to migrate toward solid state recording. This paper outlines some of the important areas that are new to solid state recording as well as examining some of the issues involved in moving to a direct recording methodology. Some of the parameters used to choose a solid state memory architecture are included. A matrix to compare various methods of data recording, such as solid state and magnetic tape recording, will be discussed. These various methods will be evaluated using the following parameters: Ruggedness (Shock, Vibration, Temperature), Capacity, and Reliability (Error Correction). A short discussion of data formats with an emphasis on efficiency and usability is included.
    • NEXT GENERATION DIGITAL BEAMFORMING ARRAY OPTIMIZED BY NEURAL NETWORK BEAMFORMING TECHNIQUES

      Sullivan, Arthur; Christodoulou, Christos; Chandler, Charles W. (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1998-10)
      The next generation Digital Beamforming Array (DBFA) requires techniques beyond the existing adaptive processing and optimization approaches. By utilizing neural network processing and genetic algorithms that mimic complicated natural processes, such as the brain and natural selection, new and superior Antenna Arrays can be designed. The use of Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithms combined with the existing techniques for DBFAs can yield the ultimate in “real-time,” “smart” antenna performance. Cost is significantly reduced by; allowing large manufacturing tolerances, the use of inexpensive components, and correcting by neural network techniques. This paper describes the technology and proposes a practical application of the technique to design a DBFA to track and transmit/receive telemetry from a shipboard vertically launched medium range missile.
    • OPTIMIZING FLIGHT SHOCK AND VIBRATION MEASUREMENT BY RF LINKS

      Walter, Patrick L.; Texas Christian University; Endevco (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1998-10)
      Acquiring shock and vibration data from flight vehicles through rf telemetry links has numerous associated challenges. Yet, these measurements are important to establish environmental specifications to provide a basis for system or component design and testing. The principal limitation in acquiring these measurements is the frequency bandwidth available for data transmission. This limited bandwidth is often responsible for invalid data being accepted as valid. This work provides a brief review of time and frequency division multiplexing to identify the potential error contributors to shock and vibration measurements. Its focus is on the design of acceleration measurement systems to eliminate these errors and optimize individual measurement channel performance.
    • PCI BASED TELEMETRY DECOMMUTATION BOARD

      Jerome, Chris; Johnson, Edward; Sittler, Arthur; Wainwright, Ross; Voss Scientific; Air Force Research Laboratory (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1998-10)
      The Space Sensing & Vehicle Control Branch of the Air Force Research Laboratory and Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM, are developing an advanced PC and COTS-based satellite telemetry processing, analysis and display system known as the PC-Satellite Telemetry Server (PC-STS). This program grew out of a need to develop less expensive, more capable, more flexible, and expandable solutions to the satellite telemetry analysis requirements of the Air Force. Any new system must employ industry standard, open architecture, network and database protocols allowing for easy growth and migration to new technologies, as they become available. Thus, the PC-STS will run on standard personal computers and the Windows NT operating system. The focus of this work and this paper is the Telemetry Server component, and in particular, the custom-built decommutation board. The decommution board will be capable of processing frame formatted and CCSDS packet telemetry. It will be capable of fully decommutating telemetry data, converting raw data to engineering units, and providing this data to the Telemetry Server host. Time tagged engineering units or minor frames of telemetry will be transmitted to the Telemetry Server processor via on-board memory buffers. The decom board uses the PCI bus, programmable DSPs, considerable on-board memory, and a SCSI bus for local archiving. This paper presents the general architecture of the PC-STS, and discusses specific design considerations. These include trade-offs made during the design of the board’s hardware and software, operational specifications, and graphical user interfaces to program, monitor, and control the board.
    • PRECISE TIME SYNCHRONIZATION DATA ACQUISITION WITH REMOTE SYSTEMS

      Berg, Dale E.; Robertson, Perry J.; Sandia National Laboratories (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1998-10)
      Researchers at the National Wind Technology Center have identified a need to acquire data on the rotor of an operating wind turbine at precisely the same time as other data is acquired on the ground or a non-rotating part of the wind turbine. The researchers will analyze that combined data with statistical and correlation techniques to clearly establish phase information and loading paths and insights into the structural loading of wind turbines. A data acquisition unit has been developed to acquire the data from the rotating system at precise universal times specified by the user. The unit utilizes commercial data acquisition hardware, spread-spectrum radio modems, and a Global Positioning System receiver; and a custom-built programmable logic device. A prototype of the system is now operational, and initial field deployment is anticipated this summer.
    • QUALIFYING THE COCKPIT VOICE RECORDER AS AN INSTRUMENTATION RECORDER AND AIRCRAFT STRUCTURAL MONITORING INSTRUMENT

      Rohre, Stuart M.; The University of Texas at Austin (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1998-10)
      A novel concept using the cockpit voice recorder (CVR) as a structural vibration recording device, to aid in structural health monitoring of commercial and military aircraft, is outlined. The unused cables in the CVR wiring harness act as “latent transducers” that respond to structural vibrations, generating vibration signals, which the CVR records. Postprocessing of such data can provide clues to problem areas or changes in the signature of the aircraft. The standards which the CVR must meet to qualify as a instrumentation-quality recorder are discussed and the steps required to assure compliance are outlined.
    • RADIO FREQUENCY OVERVIEW OF THE HIGH EXPLOSIVE RADIO TELEMETRY PROJECT

      Bracht, Roger; Dimsdle, Jeff; Rich, Dave; Smith, Frank; Los Alamos National Laboratory; AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1998-10)
      High explosive radio telemetry (HERT) is a project that is being developed jointly by Los Alamos National Laboratory and AlliedSignal FM&T. The ultimate goal is to develop a small, modular telemetry system capable of high-speed detection of explosive events, with an accuracy on the order of 10 nanoseconds. The reliable telemetry of this data, from a high-speed missile trajectory, is a very challenging opportunity. All captured data must be transmitted in less than 20 microseconds of time duration. This requires a high bits/Hertz microwave telemetry modulation code to insure transmission of the data within the limited time interval available.
    • RADIO FREQUENCY PATH CHARACTERIZATION FOR WIDE BAND QUADRATURE AMPLITUDE MODULATION

      Bracht, Roger; Los Alamos National laboratory (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1998-10)
      Remote, high speed, high explosive wave front monitoring requires very high bandwidth telemetry to allow transmission of diagnostic data before the explosion destroys the sensor system itself. The main motivation for this study is that no known existing implementation of this sort has been applied to realistic weapons environments. These facts have prompted the research and gathering of data that can be used to extrapolate towards finding the best modulation method for this application. In addition to research of similar existing analysis and testing operations, data was recently captured from a Joint Test Assembly (JTA) Air Launched Cruise Missile (ALCM) flight.
    • Range Communications System Using Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM)

      Eslinger, Brian; McCombe, Joleen; TYBRIN Corp.; Edwards Air Force Base (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1998-10)
      As aircraft become more complex and require more resources over larger areas, the challenge of the test ranges is to provide economical solutions to move telemetry data from the test article to the data processing facility. Edwards AFB is in the process of upgrading the ground transmission facilities to transport data including telemetry using Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM). This paper documents the challenge of supporting telemetry over ATM, different approaches that are available, the benefits of using ATM, and discussion of candidate hardware options. The effort at Edwards include the linking of the major range facilities over a fiber optic backbone and links to other major test ranges in the Southwest Range Complex via microwave. The fiber optic backbone is expected to be OC-12c (622 Mbps) ATM supporting new capabilities as well as all of the legacy systems. The backbone system will be designed so that migration to OC-48 is possible without service disruption. The microwave links are multiple DS-3 capable. Some of these DS-3s may support legacy systems, but the ability to link ranges using ATM is expected simultaneously.
    • RCC 319-92 AND ARMY TACMS (ATACMS) AN UNCOMMON EXPERIENCE

      Thomas, D. Paul; Lockheed Martin Vought Systems (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1998-10)
      The Range Commanders Council "Flight Termination Systems Commonality Standard," RCC 319-92, has been written with the noble goal of providing "common design, test, and documentation requirements for Flight Termination Systems (FTS)." As is often the case with standards of any kind, the devil is in the details! The Army TACMS (ATACMS) Block II Flight Termination/Telemetry System design has been significantly affected by the constraints imposed by RCC 319-92 as well as by Lockheed Martin Vought Systems customers' interpretations of those constraints and requirements. Important system elements are discussed along with some of the engineering decisions made to achieve compliance and the rationale behind those decisions. It is hoped that this monograph will acquaint potential users of RCC 319-92 with some of the issues involved in achieving compliance.
    • REAL-TIME DATA SERVER-CLIENT SYSTEM FOR THE NEAR REAL-TIME RESEARCH ANALYSIS OF ENSEMBLE DATA

      Ng, Sunny; Wei, Mei Y.; Somes, Austin; Aoyagi, Mich; Leung, Joe; National Aeronautics and Space Administration; Recom Technologies (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1998-10)
      This paper describes a distributed network client-server system developed for researchers to perform real-time or near-real-time analyses on ensembles of telemetry data previously done in post-flight. The client-server software approach provides extensible computing and real-time access to data at multiple remote client sites. Researchers at remote sites can share similar information as those at the test site. The system has been used successfully in numerous commercial, academic and NASA wide aircraft flight testing.
    • REAL-TIME INTEGRATION OF RADAR INFORMATION, AND GROUND AND RADIOSONDE METEOROLOGY WITH FLIGHT RESEARCH DATA

      Billings, Don; Wei, Mei; Leung, Joseph; Aoyagi, Michio; Shigemoto, Fred; Honeyman, Rob; NASA; Recom Technologies (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1998-10)
      Although PCM/TDM framed data is one of the most prevalent formats handled by flight test ranges, it is often required to acquire and process other types. Examples of such non-standard data types are radar position information and meteorological data from both ground based and radiosonde systems. To facilitate the process and management of such non-standard data types, a micro-processor based system was developed to acquire and transform them into a standard PCM/TDM data frame. This obviated the expense of developing additional special software and hardware to handle such non-standard data types.
    • Real-Time Telemetry Network

      Chalfant, Timothy A.; Gurr, Richard; Edwards Air Force Base (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1998-10)
      We need to begin to define what the future of point-to-point telemetry will be in the new world of wireless communications, increasing bandwidth requirements, the integration of test and training, and modeling and simulation (M&S) interacting with open air ranges. The Advanced Range Telemetry Program will introduce several new technologies to the telemetry community over the next several years, how will we use and build on them for the future? What kind of architecture will we need to be able to interact with the M&S and Training communities? How do we create that architecture and to what use would it be put by a test program? The answer, we believe, is to build the equivalent of a network in the sky. An extension of the Internet, in simplistic terms. The system under test (SUT), or the systems in training would become nodes of a large interactive network. Instead of the SUT being treated as something outside the sphere of control for the range, the SUTs onboard instrumentation systems would become an integral part of the greater range complex. This paper will address what the architecture of a real-time telemetry network might look like and how it could be implemented within the telemetry community.
    • A REAL-TIME TELEMETRY SIMULATOR OF THE IUS SPACECRAFT

      Drews, Michael E.; Forman, Douglas A.; Baker, Damon M.; Khazoyan, Louis B.; Viazzo, Danilo; Octant Technologies, Inc.; Boeing Information; Integrated Systems, Inc. (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1998-10)
      A real-time telemetry simulator of the IUS spacecraft has recently entered operation to train Flight Control Teams for the 1aunch of the AXAF telescope from the Shuttle. The simulator has proven to be a successful higher fidelity implementation of its predecessor, while affirming the rapid development methodology used in its design. Although composed of COTS hardware and software, the system simulates the full breadth of the mission: Launch, Pre-Deployment-Checkout, Burn Sequence, and AXAF/IUS separation. Realism is increased through patching the system into the operations facility to simulate IUS telemetry, Shuttle telemetry, and the Tracking Station link (commands and status message).