• USING COOPERATIVE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENTS (CRADA) TO REDUCE THE TRANSITION TO PRODUCTION RISK OF A MISSILE TELEMETRY SECTION

      Kujiraoka, Scott R.; Fielder, Russell G.; NAVAIR (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2007-10)
      The Joint Advanced Missile Instrumentation (JAMI) Program’s main thrust has been the integration of Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking technology into the Department of Defense (DoD) Missile Test Ranges. This technology could be used for Time, Space, Position, and Information (TSPI), Flight Termination (FTS), or End Game Scoring purposes. However the Program’s main goal is to develop Proof-of-Concept components only. Transitioning Missile technology developed by the Government to Private Industry, so that it can be economically mass produced, has been quite a challenge. Traditionally, private industry has had to bid on proposals without much detailed information on how these components have been designed and fabricated. These unknown risks, Non-Recurring Engineering (NRE) and Missile Flight Qualification costs, routinely have significantly increased the price of these procurement contracts. In order so that the Fleet can economically utilize these components in the field, Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA) between the Government and Private Industry have been used to successfully transition Government developed technology to mass production. They can eliminate the NRE and flight qualification costs to provide for an economical and low risk method of providing the Fleet with the latest advances in GPS Tracking Technology. This paper will discuss how this is currently being accomplished in the development of a conformal wraparound instrumentation antenna for a five-inch diameter Missile Telemetry (TM) Section.