• 800 Mbps TELEMETRY PROCESSING SYSTEM

      Bishop, Jim; Welch, John; TSI TelSys, Inc. (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2000-10)
      Satellites are becoming more capable and complex, as such their downlink requirements are increasing. In addition, future satellite systems will be operating at Ka-band that provides ample bandwidth to support the increase in downlink rates up to 800 Mbps. This paper describes a new generation commercial solution that can support 800 Mbps telemetry processing for data reception, frame synchronization, time tagging, Reed-Solomon forward error correction, data routing, data storage, data playback for testing, networking, and Bit Error Rate (BER) Testing.
    • A COMMERCIAL CCSDS TELECOMMAND PROCESSOR

      Shi, Jeff; Flanagan, Barbara; Mao, Tony; Sanford, Terry; TSI TelSys, Inc. (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2000-10)
      After a slow start, the CCSDS Telecommand Recommendation is finally being embraced by a large number of NASA, ESA and NASDA space missions. Even some commercial satellites are exploring the possibility of using this advanced protocol. The CCSDS Telecommand is a closed-loop space communication protocol that offers its users a guaranteed data delivery service, which is essential for the satellite control operations. This paper describes a commercial product that supports the CCSDS Telecommand protocol. This product provides Telecommand uplink segmentation, transfer, coding and physical layer services and Command Operations Procedures (COP). Optionally, it provides corresponding functions at the receiving end for command link verification.
    • DIGITAL DATA RECORDING: NEW WAYS IN DATA PROCESSING

      Mueller, Guenter; DASA (EADS) (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2000-10)
      With the introduction of digital data recorders new ways of data processing have been developed. The three most important improvements are discussed in this paper: A) By processing PCM Data from a digital recorder by using the SCSI-Interface our ground station has developed software to detect the synchronization pattern of the PCM data and then perform software frame decommutation. Many advantages will be found with this method. B) New digital recorders already use the CCSDS Standard as the internal recording format. Once this technique is implemented in our ground station’s software and becomes part of our software engineering team’s general know-how, the switch to CCSDS telemetry in the future will require no quantum leap in effort. C) Digital recorders offer a very new application: Writing data to a digital tape in the recorder’s own format, allows the replay of data using the recorder’s interfaces; i.e. writing vibration data from the host system to tape, using the analog format of the digital recorder, allows the analysis of the data either in analog form, using the analog interface of the recorder, or in digital form.
    • FQPSK DEVELOPMENTS RECOMMENDED FOR CCSDS STANDARDIZATION BY NASA JPL

      Martin, Warren L.; California Institute of Technology (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2000-10)
      In 1992, international space agencies became concerned that increasing frequency band congestion, together with attempts by the mobile telephone industry to obtain additional bandwidth, would result in substantially more interference incidents. The CCSDS undertook a technical study to identify and recommend more bandwidth efficient modulation schemes, which would permit more users to co-exist in a frequency band while reducing interference incidents. This paper describes the contribution of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to that effort.
    • HARDWARE DOWNLOADABLE MULTI-FUNCTION TELEMETRY INPUT MODULE

      Nicolais, Ray; Nicolo, Stephen J.; Snyder, Ed; GDP Space Systems (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2000-10)
      This paper describes a Multi-Function Telemetry Input Module (TIM). The TIM module includes a 30 Mbps PCM frame synchronizer, a time code translator/generator, a PCM simulator and a tunable bit synchronizer all on a single PCI card. The module uses a generic architecture including: high density Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), look-up table memory, dual port A/B data buffer memory and a full function PCI interface. The FPGA and the logic function of the card are downloadable via the PCI interface. This allows a single module to support many hardware functions in a telemetry front-end. The TIM is an integral part of a PC-based Advanced Telemetry Processing and Display System. This concept for hardware design ushers in a new generation of flexible downloadable telemetry products.
    • NEW TELEMETRY HARDWARE FOR THE DEEP SPACE NETWORK TELEMETRY PROCESSOR SYSTEM

      Puri, Amit; Ozkan, Siragan; Schaefer, Peter; Anderson, Bob; Williams, Mike; Avtec Systems, Inc. (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2000-10)
      This paper describes the new Telemetry Processor Hardware (TPH) that Avtec Systems has developed for the Deep Space Network (DSN) Telemetry Processor (TLP) system. Avtec is providing the Telemetry Processor Hardware to RTLogic! for integration into the Telemetry Processor system. The Deep Space Network (DSN) is an international network of antennas that supports interplanetary spacecraft missions for exploration of the solar system and the universe. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the DSN for NASA. The TLP system provides the capability to acquire, process, decode and distribute deep space probe and Earth orbiter telemetry data. The new TLP systems will be deployed at each of the three deep-space communications facilities placed approximately 120 degrees apart around the world: at Goldstone, California; near Madrid, Spain; and near Canberra, Australia. The Telemetry Processor Hardware (TPH) supports both CCSDS and TDM telemetry data formats. The TPH performs the following processing steps: soft-symbol input selection and measurement; convolutional decoding; routing to external decoders; time tagging; frame synchronization; derandomization; and Reed-Solomon decoding. The TPH consists of a VME Viterbi Decoder/MCD III Interface board (VM-7001) and a PCI-mezzanine Frame Synchronizer/Reed-Solomon Decoder (PMC- 6130-J) board. The new Telemetry Processor Hardware is implemented using the latest Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology to provide the density and speed to meet the current requirements as well as the flexibility to accommodate processing enhancements in the future.
    • ON THROUGHPUT ANALYSIS OF THE MARS IN-SITU ARQ PROTOCOL

      Liang, Robert; Kwan, Bruce; Florens, Cedric; Jet Propulsion Laboratory (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2000-10)
      Combating harsh and unpredictable channel environments is a part of the design of any in-situ communication system (i.e. rover to lander, rover to orbiter, etc.). Channel characteristics can range from simple additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channels to more bursty fading channels found in rover to orbiter links (i.e. canyon scenarios and typical orbiter passes around mountain ranges). A combination of forward error correction and automatic repeat request (ARQ) schemes are commonly used to provide a more robust communications link. ARQ enhances the communication link particularly for bursty fading channels. Go-Back-N is a commonly used ARQ scheme and is an option in the newly developed Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) Proximity-1 Link protocol [7], a data link layer protocol targeted specifically for in-situ applications. Optimization of frame sizes and retransmission persistence of the ARQ scheme require a good analytical model of how the scheme performs over various channel conditions. In this paper, an analytical framework for modeling the COP-1 protocol is presented for both AWGN channels along with bursty fading channels. A Gilbert-Elliot two-state Markov model is used to model a bursty fading channel.
    • USING PACKET TELEMETRY (CCSDS) FOR MISSILE PROGRAM TO ACHIEVE FLEXIBILITY AND COST REDUCTIONS

      Askeland, Arvid; Haukeli, Tom Rune; Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2000-10)
      New Norwegian anti-ship missile program (NSM) has evaluated both the fixed format and the packet telemetry for its log/telemetry system. It is important that the NSM log system is easy to reconfigure, since the system shall be used during debugging, lab testing, system testing, test firings, and later on for operational evaluation firings. The packet telemetry standard has been selected because the packet telemetry provides dynamics and flexibility for changes, which are not easy to achieve with fixed format. Test results and system experience will be available before October and a summary will be presented at the ITC 2000 conference.