• Expanding the Role of Telemetry in the Aircraft and Space Vehicle Factory Acceptance Test to a Design Driver Allowing 100% Equipment to be Identified that Suffer Infant Mortality Failures

      Losik, Len; Failure Analysis (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2009-10)
      The aircraft, satellite, missile and launch vehicle industry suffer from catastrophic infant mortality failures rate at ~25% even after exhaustive and comprehensive factory acceptance testing is completed causing unreliable systems, program delays and cost overruns. The discovery of the presence of deterministic behavior in equipment analog telemetry generated during factory acceptance testing preceding all equipment failures, which is identifiable using prognostic analysis, eliminates infant mortality failures resulting in increased equipment reliability, lower program cost, shorter test and delivery schedule and increased equipment usable life ensuring mission success. The addition of a single, embedded analog telemetry measurement to all active equipment allowing all equipment to be identified during factory testing that fails, and all equipment that will fail within the first year of use, to be identified will allow vehicle builders to lower program cost, use less equipment, use less testing and have a shorter delivery schedule and more reliable equipment and longer equipment usable life expanding the use of telemetry to identifying equipment that will fail well into the future.
    • Using Generic Telemetry Prognostic Algorithms for Launch Vehicle and Spacecraft Independent Failure Analysis Service

      Losik, Len; Failure Analysis (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2009-10)
      Current equipment and vehicle failure analysis practices use diagnostic technology developed over the past 100 years of designing and manufacturing electrical and mechanical equipment to identify root cause of equipment failure requiring expertise with the equipment under analysis. If the equipment that failed had telemetry embedded, prognostic algorithms can be used to identify the deterministic behavior in completely normal appearing data from fully functional equipment used for identifying which equipment will fail within 1 year of use, can also identify when the presence of deterministic behavior was initiated for any equipment failure.
    • Using Oracol® for Predicting Long-Term Telemetry Behavior for Earth and Lunar Orbiting and Interplanetary Spacecraft

      Losik, Len; Failure Analysis (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2009-10)
      Providing normal telemetry behavior predictions prior to and post launch will help to stop surprise catastrophic satellite and spacecraft equipment failures. In-orbit spacecraft fail from surprise equipment failures that can result from not having normal telemetry behavior available for comparison with actual behavior catching satellite engineers by surprise. Some surprise equipment failures lead to the total loss of the satellite or spacecraft. Some recovery actions as a consequence of a surprise equipment failure are high risk and involve decisions requiring a level of experience far beyond the responsible engineers.
    • Using Telemetry Science, An Adaptation of Prognostic Algorithms for Predicting Normal Space Vehicle Telemetry Behavior from Space for Earth and Lunar Satellites and Interplanetary Spacecraft

      Losik, Len; Failure Analysis (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2009-10)
      Prognostic technology uses a series of algorithms, combined forms a prognostic-based inference engine (PBIE) for the identification of deterministic behavior embedded in completely normal appearing telemetry from fully functional equipment. The algorithms used to define normal behavior in the PBIE from which deterministic behavior is identified can be adapted to quantify normal spacecraft telemetry behavior while in orbit about a moon or planet or during interplanetary travel. Time-series analog engineering data (telemetry) from orbiting satellites and interplanetary spacecraft are defined by harmonic and non-harmonic influences which shape it behavior. Spectrum analysis can be used to understand and quantify the fundamental behavior of spacecraft analog telemetry and relate the behavior's frequency and phase to its time-series behavior through Fourier analysis.