• Upgrade of RCB Receivers for C-Band Reception

      Hamilton, Terry; L-3 Communications Telemetry East; Global Network Solutions (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2009-10)
      Existing telemetry ground receivers typically operate in a bandwidth between 215MHz to 2485MHz, while the new C-Band covers 4.4GHz to 5.15GHz. Additionally, some installations are choosing to incorporate down converters in the antenna as an alternate approach. This paper describes an innovative approach to solving all of these problems, by enhancing the capabilities of existing range assets. The plan is to upgrade existing fielded receivers without impacting their existing functionality to also include C-Band reception. The upgrade module along with the software revision will provide the user with a fully functional receiver in the existing bands and the newly added bands. This will be accomplished by the development of an advanced down converter sections with coverage across all bands that will replace existing modules within the telemetry receivers. It is the details of this development that will be presented.
    • Using Generic Telemetry Prognostic Algorithms for Launch Vehicle and Spacecraft Independent Failure Analysis Service

      Losik, Len; Failure Analysis (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2009-10)
      Current equipment and vehicle failure analysis practices use diagnostic technology developed over the past 100 years of designing and manufacturing electrical and mechanical equipment to identify root cause of equipment failure requiring expertise with the equipment under analysis. If the equipment that failed had telemetry embedded, prognostic algorithms can be used to identify the deterministic behavior in completely normal appearing data from fully functional equipment used for identifying which equipment will fail within 1 year of use, can also identify when the presence of deterministic behavior was initiated for any equipment failure.
    • Using Oracol® for Predicting Long-Term Telemetry Behavior for Earth and Lunar Orbiting and Interplanetary Spacecraft

      Losik, Len; Failure Analysis (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2009-10)
      Providing normal telemetry behavior predictions prior to and post launch will help to stop surprise catastrophic satellite and spacecraft equipment failures. In-orbit spacecraft fail from surprise equipment failures that can result from not having normal telemetry behavior available for comparison with actual behavior catching satellite engineers by surprise. Some surprise equipment failures lead to the total loss of the satellite or spacecraft. Some recovery actions as a consequence of a surprise equipment failure are high risk and involve decisions requiring a level of experience far beyond the responsible engineers.
    • Using Telemetry Science, An Adaptation of Prognostic Algorithms for Predicting Normal Space Vehicle Telemetry Behavior from Space for Earth and Lunar Satellites and Interplanetary Spacecraft

      Losik, Len; Failure Analysis (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2009-10)
      Prognostic technology uses a series of algorithms, combined forms a prognostic-based inference engine (PBIE) for the identification of deterministic behavior embedded in completely normal appearing telemetry from fully functional equipment. The algorithms used to define normal behavior in the PBIE from which deterministic behavior is identified can be adapted to quantify normal spacecraft telemetry behavior while in orbit about a moon or planet or during interplanetary travel. Time-series analog engineering data (telemetry) from orbiting satellites and interplanetary spacecraft are defined by harmonic and non-harmonic influences which shape it behavior. Spectrum analysis can be used to understand and quantify the fundamental behavior of spacecraft analog telemetry and relate the behavior's frequency and phase to its time-series behavior through Fourier analysis.
    • Virtualization Security Issues in Telemetry Post-Processing Environments

      Kalibjian, Jeff; Hewlett Packard Corporation (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2009-10)
      Virtualization technologies have the potential to transform the telemetry post-processing environment. Significant efficiencies can be gained by migrating telemetry post processing activities to virtual computing platforms. However, while facilitating better server utilization, virtualization also presents several challenges; one of the most difficult of those challenges being security. In virtualization, server environments are replicated in software; unfortunately, the security individual servers provide is not replicated in a software stack implementation of a server environment. After reviewing virtualization fundamentals, security issues and their impact on telemetry post processing will be discussed.
    • A Wireless Telemetry System to Monitor Gait in Patients with Lower-Limb Amputation

      Fan, Richard E.; Wottawa, Christopher R.; Wyatt, Marilynn P.; Sander, Todd C.; Culjat, Martin O.; Culjat, Martin O.; Center for Advanced Surgical and Interventional Technology (CASIT); UCLA; Naval Medical Center San Diego; Naval Health Research Center (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2009-10)
      Even after rehabilitation, patients with lower-limb amputation may continue to exhibit suboptimal gait. A wireless telemetry system, featuring force sensors, accelerometers, control electronics and a Bluetooth transmission module was developed to measure plantar pressure information and remotely monitor patient mobility. Plantar pressure characterization studies were performed to determine the optimal sensor placement. Finally, the wireless telemetry system was integrated with a previously developed haptic feedback system in order to allow remote monitoring of patient mobility during haptic system validation trials.