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dc.contributor.advisorChalasani, Pavanien
dc.contributor.advisorMcEvoy, Meganen
dc.contributor.authorHigh, Rachel
dc.creatorHigh, Rachelen
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-30T16:37:10Zen
dc.date.available2015-09-30T16:37:10Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationHigh, Rachel. (2015). Detection of Chemotherapy-Induced Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer (Bachelor's thesis, University of Arizona, Tucson, USA).
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/578931en
dc.description.abstractCaspase-cleaved keratin 18 (K18) is used as a biomarker of apoptosis to measure chemotherapy-induced cell death. The M30-FITC antibody can be used as a method of detection for caspase-cleaved K18, giving it potential as a prognostic and predictive tool in cancer treatment. This study tests the M30-FITC antibody for use with the human breast cancer cell lines MCF7, SKBR3, and MDA-MB-231 in flow cytometry, with the goal of optimizing the M30-FITC assay for use in human whole blood. The assay was evaluated for use with two different apoptotic pathways: first induced by the chemotherapy docetaxel (Taxotere), and then by the tumor inhibitor staurosporine. Analysis indicates that the M30-FITC antibody requires a specific caspase cleavage product to be produced during apoptosis, which the mechanism of docetaxel-induced apoptosis (mitotic catastrophe) does not appear to produce. Staurosporine treatment appears to induce apoptosis in a manner compatible for use with the M30 antibody, and is sufficient to induce apoptosis in MCF7, SKBR3, and MDA-MB-231. These treated cells are also suitably detected in spiked human whole blood, indicating the potential for clinical relevance of the assay.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.titleDetection of Chemotherapy-Induced Apoptosis in Human Breast Canceren_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineBiochemistryen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-10T12:08:31Z
html.description.abstractCaspase-cleaved keratin 18 (K18) is used as a biomarker of apoptosis to measure chemotherapy-induced cell death. The M30-FITC antibody can be used as a method of detection for caspase-cleaved K18, giving it potential as a prognostic and predictive tool in cancer treatment. This study tests the M30-FITC antibody for use with the human breast cancer cell lines MCF7, SKBR3, and MDA-MB-231 in flow cytometry, with the goal of optimizing the M30-FITC assay for use in human whole blood. The assay was evaluated for use with two different apoptotic pathways: first induced by the chemotherapy docetaxel (Taxotere), and then by the tumor inhibitor staurosporine. Analysis indicates that the M30-FITC antibody requires a specific caspase cleavage product to be produced during apoptosis, which the mechanism of docetaxel-induced apoptosis (mitotic catastrophe) does not appear to produce. Staurosporine treatment appears to induce apoptosis in a manner compatible for use with the M30 antibody, and is sufficient to induce apoptosis in MCF7, SKBR3, and MDA-MB-231. These treated cells are also suitably detected in spiked human whole blood, indicating the potential for clinical relevance of the assay.


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