Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorRankin, Lucindaen
dc.contributor.authorBirch Yeoman, Theresa Claire
dc.creatorBirch Yeoman, Theresa Claireen
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-01T02:18:34Zen
dc.date.available2015-10-01T02:18:34Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationBirch Yeoman, Theresa Claire. (2015). Exploration of the Relationship Between Stress, Diet and/or Caffeinated Drink Consumption and Migraines (Bachelor's thesis, University of Arizona, Tucson, USA).
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/578968en
dc.description.abstractA vast amount of research shows that migraines affect many people around the world. It has been suggested that stress, caffeine and artificial sweeteners are three of the many factors that can cause migraines. Caffeine, ironically, has been shown to be both a trigger and a treatment. Pre-med students have been shown to be prone to migraines as their future goals require high/successful involvement in both the community and academics. This study provides insight into whether consumption of diet drinks, caffeinated drinks and/or stress is/are correlated with the intensity or frequency of migraines by surveying pre-med students near beginning and towards the end of their undergraduate career. While there was no correlation with consumption of either artificially sweetened or caffeinated beverages, stress was found to be the most common migraine trigger for this population. Rigor of major and post-graduation plans were among the highest sources of stress. Considering the influence stress had on migraine experience and these sources of stress, learning and utilizing stress reduction methods such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Stress Inoculation Therapy (SIT), and Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) might be the most effective way to reduce intensity/frequency of migraines.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.titleExploration of the Relationship Between Stress, Diet and/or Caffeinated Drink Consumption and Migrainesen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-14T14:15:30Z
html.description.abstractA vast amount of research shows that migraines affect many people around the world. It has been suggested that stress, caffeine and artificial sweeteners are three of the many factors that can cause migraines. Caffeine, ironically, has been shown to be both a trigger and a treatment. Pre-med students have been shown to be prone to migraines as their future goals require high/successful involvement in both the community and academics. This study provides insight into whether consumption of diet drinks, caffeinated drinks and/or stress is/are correlated with the intensity or frequency of migraines by surveying pre-med students near beginning and towards the end of their undergraduate career. While there was no correlation with consumption of either artificially sweetened or caffeinated beverages, stress was found to be the most common migraine trigger for this population. Rigor of major and post-graduation plans were among the highest sources of stress. Considering the influence stress had on migraine experience and these sources of stress, learning and utilizing stress reduction methods such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Stress Inoculation Therapy (SIT), and Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) might be the most effective way to reduce intensity/frequency of migraines.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_etd_mr_2015_0047_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
884.0Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record