Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorWilliams, Brackette F.en
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Pamela Mae
dc.creatorEvans, Pamela Maeen
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-01T20:24:51Zen
dc.date.available2015-10-01T20:24:51Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/579012en
dc.description.abstractThe Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), and even the host countries, foster policies and conditions in refugee camps that restrict refugee use of previous education or livelihoods with which they could provide for their needs in exile. Would policies, which provide access to and use of previous education and livelihoods enhance refugee camp services? Would such policies improve options for and reduce time to repatriation? Typically the majority of refugees currently spend five or more years in exile, without an option to repatriate to their previous home country and location within it. If policies improved access to use of their education and livelihoods, would this alter refugee services' expectations that refugees will adapt and acculturate to host countries, rather than eventually return to their countries of origin? This thesis will argue that by anticipating repatriation, UNHCR and host countries policies would improve refugee services by fostering programs that assist refugees in using previous education and livelihoods, and thereby, reduce time between initial exile and repatriation. The same improved programs would also aid refugees in taking care of themselves outside of camps during exile in host countries. Another benefit, I argue, is that the ability to use previous education and livelihood would allow refugees to make better decisions about where to settle in their home country when repatriating. The assumption to this is a limit of the thesis to refugees who are adults when the exile began.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.titleAccess to Repatriation: The Value of Refugee's Previous Education and Livelihoodsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-18T06:08:32Z
html.description.abstractThe Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), and even the host countries, foster policies and conditions in refugee camps that restrict refugee use of previous education or livelihoods with which they could provide for their needs in exile. Would policies, which provide access to and use of previous education and livelihoods enhance refugee camp services? Would such policies improve options for and reduce time to repatriation? Typically the majority of refugees currently spend five or more years in exile, without an option to repatriate to their previous home country and location within it. If policies improved access to use of their education and livelihoods, would this alter refugee services' expectations that refugees will adapt and acculturate to host countries, rather than eventually return to their countries of origin? This thesis will argue that by anticipating repatriation, UNHCR and host countries policies would improve refugee services by fostering programs that assist refugees in using previous education and livelihoods, and thereby, reduce time between initial exile and repatriation. The same improved programs would also aid refugees in taking care of themselves outside of camps during exile in host countries. Another benefit, I argue, is that the ability to use previous education and livelihood would allow refugees to make better decisions about where to settle in their home country when repatriating. The assumption to this is a limit of the thesis to refugees who are adults when the exile began.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_etd_mr_2015_0095_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
510.7Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record