Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorDovi, Suzanneen
dc.contributor.authorRedhouse, Vincent Peter
dc.creatorRedhouse, Vincent Peteren
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-02T01:15:08Zen
dc.date.available2015-10-02T01:15:08Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/579023en
dc.description.abstractI argue that sweatshops cannot be morally grounded in arguments based on the autonomy of workers. I propose that merely because sweatshops are a better alternative than other options does not mean that the choice to work in sweatshops is one that we ought to respect; I also propose that choice itself does not always entail voluntariness. To make my arguments I utilize a framework of soft paternalism with a threshold for truly voluntary action to be delineated by one's ability to act as a global maximizer. I do not appeal the potential exploitative nature of sweatshop factories. Exploitation, I argue, presupposes that a group be in a position that is exploitable and that we believe that it morally permissible to treat individuals as merely having local maximizing preferences.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.titleA Responsible Treatise on Sweatshopsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePhilosophy, Politics, Economics and Lawen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-10T12:17:08Z
html.description.abstractI argue that sweatshops cannot be morally grounded in arguments based on the autonomy of workers. I propose that merely because sweatshops are a better alternative than other options does not mean that the choice to work in sweatshops is one that we ought to respect; I also propose that choice itself does not always entail voluntariness. To make my arguments I utilize a framework of soft paternalism with a threshold for truly voluntary action to be delineated by one's ability to act as a global maximizer. I do not appeal the potential exploitative nature of sweatshop factories. Exploitation, I argue, presupposes that a group be in a position that is exploitable and that we believe that it morally permissible to treat individuals as merely having local maximizing preferences.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_etd_mr_2015_0227_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
246.5Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record