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dc.contributor.advisorGomez, Rebeccaen
dc.contributor.authorPesqueira, Lucero Ivetteen
dc.creatorPesqueira, Lucero Ivetteen
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-05T22:14:57Zen
dc.date.available2015-10-05T22:14:57Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/579296en
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study is to determine if there exists a relation between a child's napping status and performance in a word-learning task. In determining such a relation we can better understand the mechanisms that assist children with learning information allowing us to accordingly contribute to their success. To assess word learning we employed an object-context task where 34 children aged 48-53 months were trained on two labeled objects presented on colored fabric. During testing, these objects were simultaneously presented (on the same or a different fabric) and asked to identify the correct object. After applying a two-way ANOVA of sleep (no nap, nap) and context (same, different) on word learning performance, a significant main effect of nap on word learning performance was found, F(1, 30)= 6.53, p=.02. This finding is crucial as children this age are transitioning to fewer or no naps, which can impact their ability to learn new words.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.titleDo Naps Still Matter: 4-Year-Olds and Word Learningen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-19T15:30:51Z
html.description.abstractThe purpose of this study is to determine if there exists a relation between a child's napping status and performance in a word-learning task. In determining such a relation we can better understand the mechanisms that assist children with learning information allowing us to accordingly contribute to their success. To assess word learning we employed an object-context task where 34 children aged 48-53 months were trained on two labeled objects presented on colored fabric. During testing, these objects were simultaneously presented (on the same or a different fabric) and asked to identify the correct object. After applying a two-way ANOVA of sleep (no nap, nap) and context (same, different) on word learning performance, a significant main effect of nap on word learning performance was found, F(1, 30)= 6.53, p=.02. This finding is crucial as children this age are transitioning to fewer or no naps, which can impact their ability to learn new words.


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