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dc.contributor.advisorBorek, Karenen
dc.contributor.authorOxnam, Danielle Marie
dc.creatorOxnam, Danielle Marieen
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-05T22:17:26Zen
dc.date.available2015-10-05T22:17:26Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/579319en
dc.description.abstractThis paper seeks to explore the connection between the parables of the New Testament and modern religious fiction such as C. S. Lewis's The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. Since biblical writers recorded Jesus of Nazareth speaking in parables, essentially extended metaphors with a narrative quality, the connection between these ancient tales and modern religious stories is compelling. By examining similar literary features, structural components, and content we will see the similarities in function and purpose behind these two genres. Both access the creative faculties of their audience to allow ideas to germinate from a uniquely inventive part of the imagination. By using Lewis's novel as comparison we will see a direct correlation of technique between parabolic speaking and modern storytelling. In addition, this particular novel illustrates the technique of reading the gospel narrative as a parable itself by retelling and repainting the story of Jesus of First Century Palestine in Aslan of Narnia. By examining Lewis's story in comparison to the story of the gospels, one can understand a modern view of the Christ story in new ways.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.titleA Modern-Day Parable: A Critical Examination of The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe in Comparison to the Parables of the New Testamenten_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineReligious Studiesen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-14T22:01:03Z
html.description.abstractThis paper seeks to explore the connection between the parables of the New Testament and modern religious fiction such as C. S. Lewis's The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. Since biblical writers recorded Jesus of Nazareth speaking in parables, essentially extended metaphors with a narrative quality, the connection between these ancient tales and modern religious stories is compelling. By examining similar literary features, structural components, and content we will see the similarities in function and purpose behind these two genres. Both access the creative faculties of their audience to allow ideas to germinate from a uniquely inventive part of the imagination. By using Lewis's novel as comparison we will see a direct correlation of technique between parabolic speaking and modern storytelling. In addition, this particular novel illustrates the technique of reading the gospel narrative as a parable itself by retelling and repainting the story of Jesus of First Century Palestine in Aslan of Narnia. By examining Lewis's story in comparison to the story of the gospels, one can understand a modern view of the Christ story in new ways.


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