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dc.contributor.advisorBaldwin, Annen
dc.contributor.authorTay, Kimberly Sarah
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-07T00:06:31Zen
dc.date.available2015-10-07T00:06:31Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/579419en
dc.description.abstractObjective: This study investigated the effects of the breathing practice in vinyasa yoga on heart rate variability (HRV) in university students. High HRV is correlated with decreased anxiety and improved performance. It was hypothesized that HRV would increase and heart rate (HR) would decrease after yoga. Design: Thirteen students were enrolled into a 10-week yoga program and asked to attend at least 5 yoga classes. Before and after the class, the students' H RV, and in some cases respiration rate, were measured. Each participant's measures were compared pre and post yoga sessions, and statistical differences or trends in the data were evaluated. Setting: The study was performed in the Campus Recreational Center, University of Arizona. Results: For students who attended 3 yoga sessions, HRV (standard deviation of inter beat intervals) significantly increased post versus pre for each session, and HRV in the low frequency range (LF power) was significantly increased after the third session compared to pre first session [1348±1468 ms² (SD) vs. 3796 ± 3456 ms² , n=10]. Heart rate did not significantly change. Average respiration rate pre first session was 14.77 ± 2.54 (SD) br/min compared to 8.53 ± 2.56 after the last yoga session for which respiratory data were taken. Conclusion: Students experience increased HRV and decreased respiration rate after yoga sessions, consistent with increased ability to handle stress.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.titleEffects of Breathing Practice in Vinyasa Yoga on Heart Rate Variability in University Studentsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.H.S.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-24T12:03:14Z
html.description.abstractObjective: This study investigated the effects of the breathing practice in vinyasa yoga on heart rate variability (HRV) in university students. High HRV is correlated with decreased anxiety and improved performance. It was hypothesized that HRV would increase and heart rate (HR) would decrease after yoga. Design: Thirteen students were enrolled into a 10-week yoga program and asked to attend at least 5 yoga classes. Before and after the class, the students' H RV, and in some cases respiration rate, were measured. Each participant's measures were compared pre and post yoga sessions, and statistical differences or trends in the data were evaluated. Setting: The study was performed in the Campus Recreational Center, University of Arizona. Results: For students who attended 3 yoga sessions, HRV (standard deviation of inter beat intervals) significantly increased post versus pre for each session, and HRV in the low frequency range (LF power) was significantly increased after the third session compared to pre first session [1348±1468 ms² (SD) vs. 3796 ± 3456 ms² , n=10]. Heart rate did not significantly change. Average respiration rate pre first session was 14.77 ± 2.54 (SD) br/min compared to 8.53 ± 2.56 after the last yoga session for which respiratory data were taken. Conclusion: Students experience increased HRV and decreased respiration rate after yoga sessions, consistent with increased ability to handle stress.


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