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dc.contributor.advisorFinan, Timothy J.en
dc.contributor.authorRahman, Md Ashiqur
dc.creatorRahman, Md Ashiquren
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-27T21:37:35Zen
dc.date.available2015-10-27T21:37:35Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/581306en
dc.description.abstractAlthough there is a growing literature on non-climatic drivers of vulnerability to climate change, there are only a few empirical case studies that demonstrate the process through which vulnerability is produced. Moreover, existing climate literatures offer very limited insights on the linkages between governance and vulnerability to climate change. Within the governance framework, this dissertation tends to contribute to the current body of knowledge by exploring the role of governance in producing vulnerability to climate change. Using southwest coastal Bangladesh as an example, this study addresses three specific research questions: (1) how mastaanocracy, a form of uneven power relations shapes vulnerability to climate change; (2) the impact of corruption, particularly bribery and extortion on livelihoods in the face of climate change; and (3) the linkage between social exclusion and climate change vulnerability. Findings suggest that unequal power relation and corruption reduces the ability of the population to cope with the stresses of climate change. Social exclusion adds an extra burden to already vulnerable segments of population. On the other hand, climatic change pushes marginalized community further away thus exacerbating social exclusion. Based on the findings, I argue that it is difficult to build resilience and achieve successful adaptation without addressing the structural factors of power and inequality.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectClimate changeen
dc.subjectCorruptionen
dc.subjectGovernanceen
dc.subjectPoweren
dc.subjectSocial exclusionen
dc.subjectAnthropologyen
dc.subjectBangladeshen
dc.titleGovernance Matters: Power, Corruption, Social Exclusion, and Climate Change in Bangladeshen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeememberFinan, Timothy J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberBaro, Mamadou A.en
dc.contributor.committeememberGreenberg, James B.en
dc.contributor.committeememberHuq, Saleemulen
dc.description.releaseRelease 04-Sep-2018en
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
html.description.abstractAlthough there is a growing literature on non-climatic drivers of vulnerability to climate change, there are only a few empirical case studies that demonstrate the process through which vulnerability is produced. Moreover, existing climate literatures offer very limited insights on the linkages between governance and vulnerability to climate change. Within the governance framework, this dissertation tends to contribute to the current body of knowledge by exploring the role of governance in producing vulnerability to climate change. Using southwest coastal Bangladesh as an example, this study addresses three specific research questions: (1) how mastaanocracy, a form of uneven power relations shapes vulnerability to climate change; (2) the impact of corruption, particularly bribery and extortion on livelihoods in the face of climate change; and (3) the linkage between social exclusion and climate change vulnerability. Findings suggest that unequal power relation and corruption reduces the ability of the population to cope with the stresses of climate change. Social exclusion adds an extra burden to already vulnerable segments of population. On the other hand, climatic change pushes marginalized community further away thus exacerbating social exclusion. Based on the findings, I argue that it is difficult to build resilience and achieve successful adaptation without addressing the structural factors of power and inequality.


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