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dc.contributor.advisorBaro, Mamadouen
dc.contributor.advisorPark, Thomasen
dc.contributor.authorHolst, Joshua
dc.creatorHolst, Joshuaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-29T18:19:46Zen
dc.date.available2015-10-29T18:19:46Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/581409en
dc.description.abstractHow can politically and ecologically vulnerable groups come to productively govern the development process? The current environmental crisis is felt most intensely by marginalized groups whose livelihoods, food security, and health are threatened as development-driven environmental problems increase. This study looks at the intersection between the state, the economy, and the grassroots as key decision-makers shape the development trajectory: environmental factions of the rebels-turned-politicians in Aceh, Indonesia, the pro-autonomy indigenous movement in the Ecuadorian Amazon, and pro-democracy insurgents in the United States. The subsequent chapters track and analyze the varied fates of insurgents in each site as they attempt to democratize the state and acquire control over local ecologies. The conclusion explores these movements as the tip of a much deeper iceberg of conflict between extractive development and anti-colonialism.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectColonialismen
dc.subjectDecentralizationen
dc.subjectInternational Developmenten
dc.subjectPolitical Ecologyen
dc.subjectSocial Movementsen
dc.subjectAnthropologyen
dc.subjectCivil Waren
dc.titleDevelopment and Conflict at the Ecological Margins: Grassroots Approaches to Democracy and Natural Resourcesen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeememberBaro, Mamadouen
dc.contributor.committeememberPark, Thomasen
dc.contributor.committeememberNichter, Marken
dc.description.releaseDissertation Not Available (per Author's Request)en
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
dc.description.admin-noteRestricted on deposit / 29-Oct-2015 / KCen_US
html.description.abstractHow can politically and ecologically vulnerable groups come to productively govern the development process? The current environmental crisis is felt most intensely by marginalized groups whose livelihoods, food security, and health are threatened as development-driven environmental problems increase. This study looks at the intersection between the state, the economy, and the grassroots as key decision-makers shape the development trajectory: environmental factions of the rebels-turned-politicians in Aceh, Indonesia, the pro-autonomy indigenous movement in the Ecuadorian Amazon, and pro-democracy insurgents in the United States. The subsequent chapters track and analyze the varied fates of insurgents in each site as they attempt to democratize the state and acquire control over local ecologies. The conclusion explores these movements as the tip of a much deeper iceberg of conflict between extractive development and anti-colonialism.


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