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dc.contributor.authorAdams, Emily*
dc.contributor.authorAlbagshi, Ayman*
dc.contributor.authorAlnatar, Khaleel*
dc.contributor.authorJacob, Gregory*
dc.contributor.authorMogk, Nathan*
dc.contributor.authorSparrold, Alexis*
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-03T17:49:40Zen
dc.date.available2015-11-03T17:49:40Zen
dc.date.issued2012-10en
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123en
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/581655en
dc.descriptionITC/USA 2012 Conference Proceedings / The Forty-Eighth Annual International Telemetering Conference and Technical Exhibition / October 22-25, 2012 / Town and Country Resort & Convention Center, San Diego, Californiaen_US
dc.description.abstractSystems that monitor environments often rely on cumbersome wires to supply power to the sensing equipment or batteries that require monitoring and replacement. As technologies continue to advance, the use of self-sustaining, wireless powering becomes more essential to satisfy challenging requirements that necessitate continuous measurement and general functionality. This paper focuses on the creation of a wireless sensor network with emphasis on the implementation of wirelessly charged sensing nodes by utilizing microwaves. Three subsystems make up this "proof of concept" wireless sensor system: a power transmitting base station, three sensor nodes, and a communication base station. Interfacing and power regulation are of the utmost importance in order to ensure all of the subsystems are able to communicate with one another and power all necessary functions. The power transmitting base station transmits microwaves to the nodes. A rectenna on each node converts the transmitted microwaves into DC power. Each node contains sensors to monitor the temperature and light of the environment. For the communication aspect of the system, Zigbee protocol, which belongs to IEEE 802.15.4 protocol, is used fore wireless communication between the base station and the nodes. Through the combination of power regulation, microwave energy, and radio transmission, users are able to utilize this system to collect environmental sensor data wirelessly.
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
dc.rightsCopyright © held by the author; distribution rights International Foundation for Telemeteringen_US
dc.titleA Wireless Sensor Network Powered by Microwave Energyen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-10T23:41:11Z
html.description.abstractSystems that monitor environments often rely on cumbersome wires to supply power to the sensing equipment or batteries that require monitoring and replacement. As technologies continue to advance, the use of self-sustaining, wireless powering becomes more essential to satisfy challenging requirements that necessitate continuous measurement and general functionality. This paper focuses on the creation of a wireless sensor network with emphasis on the implementation of wirelessly charged sensing nodes by utilizing microwaves. Three subsystems make up this "proof of concept" wireless sensor system: a power transmitting base station, three sensor nodes, and a communication base station. Interfacing and power regulation are of the utmost importance in order to ensure all of the subsystems are able to communicate with one another and power all necessary functions. The power transmitting base station transmits microwaves to the nodes. A rectenna on each node converts the transmitted microwaves into DC power. Each node contains sensors to monitor the temperature and light of the environment. For the communication aspect of the system, Zigbee protocol, which belongs to IEEE 802.15.4 protocol, is used fore wireless communication between the base station and the nodes. Through the combination of power regulation, microwave energy, and radio transmission, users are able to utilize this system to collect environmental sensor data wirelessly.


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