• Neutrality is Polite Oppression: How critical librarianship and pedagogy principles counter neutral narratives and benefit the profession

      Ferretti, Jennifer A.; Maryland Institute College of Art (The University of Arizona, 2018-11-28)
      The debate about whether or not libraries and information professionals should be neutral seems perpetual. Championing neutrality over a critical perspective intentionally furthers the oppression of not only marginalized patron populations, but of marginalized colleagues. Rooted in principles of critical pedagogy and critical librarianship, this talk will illustrate how neutrality impacts the information professions and the communities we serve, as well as ways in which our expectations of our students to critically evaluate sources can be applied to our own work. We ask our students to think about what information is missing within a resource. It’s time we not only ask our profession the same (who isn’t at the table, what isn’t being discussed, etc.), but also that we take action to counter narratives of neutrality in our everyday practices, including in the classroom and our work spaces.
    • Critical Approaches to Evaluating Student Privacy & 3rd Party Apps

      Unknown author (The University of Arizona, 2018-11-16)
      This information literacy resource was created by participants and facilitators during a workshop titled "Student privacy & third-party apps : Examining a university’s Terms of Service" at CLAPS 2018. Through reading actual contracts between technology vendors and the University or Arizona, the group of academic librarians, library administrators, and faculty developers synthesized the steps to take and information to look for in these contracts to better understand how student and worker information is collected and used by third-party vendors.
    • Design Thinking in an Hour? Or, Design Thinking: A Cautionary Tale

      Arteaga, Roberto; Pacific Lutheran University (The University of Arizona, 2018-11-16)
      Design thinking (DT) is a methodology that has become popular across many sectors due to its iterability and flexibility. As its adoption spreads throughout higher education settings, DT is now starting to appear in library literature and conferences. As teaching librarians, we may be tempted to adapt popular methodologies in the hope of increasing the reach of our work, considering how undervalued and misunderstood our work can be, but we should also consider whether DT is a potentially harmful practice. By discussing DT, what it can do, and where it can be most useful, I will present a case for why librarians who teach need not engage in a practice that treats learning as something that needs a solution and appears to sideline students and their lived experiences. Those who practice critical librarianship would be better served by adopting a student-centered pedagogy that shifts power and agency to the students, while simultaneously educating others on the work they do, why they do it, and how it contributes to student learning.
    • Contested Sites of Critical Library Pedagogy

      Almeida, Nora; Beilin, Ian; New York City College of Technology, CUNY, Brooklyn, NY; Columbia University, New York, NY (The University of Arizona, 2018-11-16)
      In this presentation we will explore critical library pedagogy in relation to different physical places and dialogic spaces. Using the idea of the library as a “third space” as a point of departure, we will consider whether alternative spatial contexts or modes of analysis might enable new forms of critique that are embodied, culturally grounded, and creative.
    • Practising Digital Pedagogy Librarianship: Building Critical and Queer Feminist Communities

      Patel, Kush; Cong-Huyen, Anne; University of Michigan (The University of Arizona, 2018-11-16)
      This workshop, led by the Digital Pedagogy Librarians at the University of Michigan Libraries, aims to address the nature and nurturing of digital pedagogy librarianship beyond its relationship to digital tools to ask: what roles do critical and queer feminist principles play in enriching our approaches to digital pedagogy and how might we constitute mutually transformative communities of practice around those principles?
    • Teaching CRAAP to Robots: Artificial Intelligence, False Binaries, and Implications for Information Literacy

      Seeber, Kevin; University of Colorado Denver (The University of Arizona, 2018-11)
      Researchers studying artificial intelligence and semantic computing are developing algorithms capable of processing large amounts of textual data and rendering judgment on its contents. Specifically, the field of sentiment analysis is focused on creating code that applies what programmers call “common sense” to evaluate whether writing is factual or opinionated, as well as how emotional the author was. This presentation will argue that these algorithms rely on false binaries, over-simplification, and poorly-constructed checklists, similar to the approach often used when discussing information literacy with first-year college students. Instead of employing this approach, this session will argue that librarians must recognize that human interpretation lies at the core of information literacy, and that we need to embrace that complexity rather than depend on algorithmic evaluation.
    • Resisting capitalist and neoliberal conceptions of information literacy

      Gregory, Lua; Higgins, Shana; University of Redlands (2018-11)
      This roundtable discussion explored the alignment of information literacy with neoliberal and capitalist conceptions of labor and corporate interests. The roundtable was accompanied by a 12 page zine which highlighted quotes from the history of librarianship in the U.S. and its connections with the rise of capitalism. Roundtable questions posed in the session, and a reference list for further reading, are also included in the zine. Email the authors for a print copy.
    • International Telemetering Conference Proceedings, Volume 54 (2018)

      Unknown author (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2018-11)
    • INTELLIGENT JAMMING USING DEEP Q-LEARNING

      Thurston, Noah; Vanhoy, Garrett; Bose, Tamal; Univ Arizona, Dept Elect & Comp Engn (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2018-11)
      The threat of a malicious user interfering with network traffic so as to deny access to resources is an inherent vulnerability of wireless networks. To combat this threat, physical layer waveforms that are resilient to interference are used to relay critical traffic. These waveforms are designed to make it difficult for a malicious user to both deny access to network resources and avoid detection. If a malicious user has perfect knowledge of the waveform being used, it can avoid detection and deny network throughput, but this knowledge is naturally limited in practice. In this work, the threat of a malicious user that can implicitly learn the nature of the waveform being used simply by observing reactions to its behavior is analyzed and potential mitigation techniques are discussed. The results show that using recurrent neural networks to implement deep Q-learning, a malicious user can converge on an optimal interference policy that simultaneously minimizes the potential for it to be detected and maximizes its impediment on network traffic.
    • WIRELESS SOIL SENSOR PODS FOR LONG-TERM DATA COLLECTION

      Lipina, Jacob; Van Horn, Andrew; Schad, Judah; Kosbar, Kurt; Missouri University of Science and Technology (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2018-11)
      This paper discusses the applications of a wireless telemetry module used to collect remote sensor data used in a teleoperated electric vehicle that competed in the 2018 Mars University Rover Challenge (URC). Remote wireless soil sensor pods, 100 cc in volume, equipped with a 32-bit microcontroller and embedded IEEE 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi were distributed at key locations to relay soil moisture and temperature values over a local repeater to a remote base station. Combined with a low power deep sleep mode (1.84 mW), two 2500 mAh lithium-ion polymer batteries, and voltage regulation electronics, such a device could periodically relay telemetry data for many years without recharge. The small size presents the opportunity for large scale production and distribution across exoplanetary surfaces for monitoring soil characteristics over time.
    • SCALABILITY OF MESH NETWORK TELEMETRY FOR SWARMS OF UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEMS

      Keshmiri, Shawn; Hauptman, Dustin; Shukla, Daksh; Blevins, Aaron; University of Kansas, Electrical Engineering & Computer Science Department; University of Kansas, Department of Aerospace Engineering (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2018-11)
      Swarms of autonomous unmanned aerial systems (UASs) are becoming increasingly popular as efficient replacement for manned aircraft. The major component that makes the swarm of UASs possible is an efficient exchange of aircrafts states (e.g. position & velocity) for all agents and the ground station. Advanced communication technologies are required to be implemented on each agent to enable real-time communication at high frequencies (e.g. 20 Hz) to avoid inter collisions and holding formations. To assess mesh network limitations and to identify bottlenecks, a series of simulations are carried out using actual hardware that is used for swarms of UASs, which are: (1) Amount of bandwidth that can be guaranteed given the communication system being used (XBee-900HP), each plane that the KU team uses, transmits 127 variables, 4 bytes each, at 20 Hz which means each plane needs 10 KBps and the mesh network might be able to support 53 UASs theoretically (2) Range limitations (3) Latency issues.
    • DTN ROUTING PROTOCOLS FOR DRONE SWARM TELEMETRY

      Brown, Jason R.; Rohrer, Justin P.; Naval Postgraduate School, Department of Computer Science (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2018-11)
      Drone swarms pose a particular challenge to telemetry networks, due to the number of airborne nodes involved, and their potential to overwhelm the available bandwidth on the communications channel with simultaneous telemetry streams. Previously, we saw that mobile ad-hoc (MANET) routing protocols could exacerbate this issue by flooding the network with routing-control packets. In this work we model the Naval Postgraduate School fixed-wing drone swarm and compare the performance of several disruption-tolerant networking (DTN) routing protocols designed to address these challenges.
    • COGNITIVE EQUALIZATION FOR HF CHANNELS

      Teku, Noel; Bose, Tamal; Univ Arizona, Dept Elect & Comp Engn (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2018-11)
      In the High Frequency (HF) band, ranging from 3-30 MHz, long-range communications can be obtained by bouncing signals off the ionosphere without any significant infrastructure. However, the ionosphere changes rapidly, which can cause potentially harmful effects to the transmitted signal. This has motivated research into using adaptive equalization in this band to reverse these effects. However, a disadvantage of this technique is that based on the equalizer model and learning algorithm used, the error propagation may become significantly large, resulting in insufficient equalization to respond to these variations. To counter this, we investigate the usage of cognitive equalization, where an adaptive equalizer is equipped with the ability to change its structure (i.e. number of taps, step size, etc.) based on the current channel conditions and use probability of error to characterize its performance.
    • Telemetry System Based on MESH Network and Its Application

      Guo, Pingfan; Liu, Ming; Li, Hong; Zhu, Hongxiang; Chinese Flight Test Establishment (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2018-11)
      In the flight test, the advantages of network telemetry have gradually emerged, and their application fields will also be expanded. This paper introduces a network telemetry system based on MESH net and its application in flight test, a ground station can receive telemetry signals of several planes at the same time; the components and functions of the system are described, the advantages of this network telemetry system, existing problems and suggestions on future improvements are presented.
    • FEMTOSATS: ELEGANT FLIGHT TELEMETRY PAYLOADS FOR MODEL ROCKETS

      Willis, Jacob; Holtom, Jacob; Walton, Patrick; Smith, Jackson; Wallin, Nikolai; Long, David G.; BYU, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2018-11)
      An elegant telemetry payload, which transmits IMU, atmospheric, or light data during flight and deployment from a small model rocket, is presented. Data is received by a custom, mobile, handpointed ground station. The payload is patterned after a thumb-sized satellite, called a femtosat. Its design is optimized for ease of implementation. The femtosat system resulted from a grassroots, student peer-mentoring program developed at Brigham Young University.
    • The Design and Application of C-band Base Station Based Multi-target Telemetry Network System

      Shiwei, Guo; Zhongjie, Wang; Xin, Zhang; Zhaohui, Huo; Chinese Flight Test Establishment (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2018-11)
      A C-band base station based multi-target telemetry network system for flight test is designed in this paper. The requirements of multi-target transmission are realized by TDMA and TDD technology. And the transmission rate of up to 50 Mbps is provided by the high efficient modulation method. An integrated air-to-ground telemetry network is built with C-band wireless two-way link. The telemetry signals of super large airspace are covered seamlessly through multiple base stations, therefore the shortage of current telemetry is solved, and the demand of multi-target and mass date transmission for flight test is satisfied. The development of the system provides technical support for the high speed data transmission of the flight test, which will lay a foundation for the construction of integrated air-to-ground test and the test network system.
    • BYU MARS ROVER AT THE 2018 UNIVERSITY ROVER CHALLENGE

      Rozsa, Jace; Averett, Tyler; Killpack, Marc; Rice, Michael; Brigham Young University (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2018-11)
      This paper describes the design and performance of the BYU mars rover with an emphasis on the wireless communications system and the transmission and reception of data vital to the performance of the rover.
    • TELLING THE T&E STORY USING ANALYTICS-BASED NARRATIVE VISUALIZATION

      Painter, Michael K.; Madanagopal, Karthic; Swaminathan, Kannan; Jones, Charles H.; Knowledge Based Systems, Inc.; C. H. Jones Consulting, LLC (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2018-11)
      There continues to be growing pressure to sell off spectrum currently allocated for defense purposes in favor of private sector applications, prompting concerns that we will soon reach a point where Department of Defense (DoD) needs can no longer be met. In response, the Range Commanders Council (RCC) Frequency Management Group (FMG) developed a baseline set of standard metrics to measure spectrum utilization, demand, efficiency, and operational effectiveness. Using this standard (RCC 707-14) as a foundation, a Spectrum Management Metrics Toolkit (SMMT) has been developed to calculate, plot, and display these metrics. The challenge now is leveraging these metrics to inform and construct the arguments needed to maintain access to needed spectrum. The purpose of this paper is to describe progress toward the development of a methodology and a set of analytics based on the RCC standard to build such a compelling narrative. The methodology is based on a data analytics and communication concept, called “Story Points,” which seeks to guide users in the discovery, composition, and delivery of targeted narratives and supporting graphics derived through mining available data sources.
    • Research on Embedded Real-time Processing Technology of ARINC429 Bus Dynamic Logic Block

      Qi, Shengyuan; Wang, Zhongjie; Shi, Fenglei; Qi, Xiaopeng; China Flight Test Establishment (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2018-11)
      ARINC429 bus is widely used. In a new type of logic block communication method, the logic layer of the application layer is composed of a plurality of ARINC429 messages, and the message length and content dynamically change. The telemetry monitoring needs real-time analysis of the application layer communication protocol to correctly interpret the user-defined message content. This paper proposes an embedded real-time processing scheme, which integrates real-time processing hardware and software in data acquisition unit. It can dynamic analysis the application layer protocol of the logic block, extract user-defined information according to the telemetry for downloading, the problems encountered in telemetry monitoring of the type of communication are solved. At the same time, this solution is also applicable to real-time analysis of other avionics bus in the application layer protocols.
    • AUTONOMOUS NAVIGATION IN DYNAMIC ENVIRONMENTS

      Buxton, Jonas; Thomure, Logan; Downs, Roger; Bosanko, Garrett; Kosbar, Kurt; Missouri University of Science and Technology (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2018-11)
      Robotic systems that operate indoors are often unable to rely on GPS, and dynamic environments prove difficult to navigate for robotic systems that rely on SLAM (Simultaneous Location and Mapping). Autonomous navigation without the use of GPS or SLAM techniques require a system to rely on more fundamental hardware and software concepts. The challenge is made even greater when the system is intended to fly, interact with moving targets, and avoid moving obstacles. This is the design criteria that our autonomous multirotor is adhering to for the International Aerial Robotics Competition. This paper will describe the purpose behind each of our multirotor's sensors, such as LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) systems and Optical Flow sensors, that enable it to accurately interact with its environment without SLAM techniques, as well as the multirotor's onboard software that powers its autonomous capabilities.