• Impact of changes in home smoking bans on tobacco cessation among quitline callers

      Yuan, Nicole P; Nair, Uma S; Crane, Tracy E; Krupski, Laurie; Collins, Bradley N; Bell, Melanie L; Department of Health Promotion Sciences; Division of Biobehavioral Health Sciences; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics (OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2019-06-01)
      Home smoking bans may be an effective way to promote tobacco cessation among treatment seeking smokers. Few studies have examined this relationship in a quitline setting. Data were obtained from 14,296 adults who were enrolled in a state quitline between January 2011 and July 2016. This study investigated whether cessation rates varied by changes in home smoking ban implementation between enrollment and 7-month follow-up. The impact of changes in home smoking bans on cessation at follow-up was significantly modified by having other smokers living in the home at follow-up (p<0.0001). Among callers who did not live with other smokers in the home, the highest odds ratio of 30-day cessation was for callers who reported bans at follow-up only (OR=10.50, 95%CI: 8.00, 13.70), followed by callers who reported bans at both enrollment and follow-up (OR=8.02, 95%CI: 6.27, 10.30) and callers who reported bans at enrollment only (OR=2.06, 95%CI:1.47, 2.89) compared to callers with no home smoking bans. When callers reported that they lived with other smokers in the home, the effect of home smoking bans on cessation was much smaller. Quitlines should support the implementation of home smoking bans as a part of callers’ goal setting activities to achieve tobacco cessation.