• Awareness of Medication-Related Fall Risk Before and After Online Education

      Lee, Jeannie; Ancheschi, Evellyn; Henry, Nicole; Votruba, Cassandra; College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona (The University of Arizona., 2017)
      Objectives: The aim of this project was to assess community-dwelling older adults’ knowledge of prescription and Over-the-Counter (OTC) medications associated with fall risk, then provide an online educational intervention tailored to older adults on the topics they answer incorrectly. The knowledge assessment of the missed questions will be repeated after the online education to detect the effectiveness of the online intervention in increasing the knowledge of community-dwelling older adults. Methods: This study used an interventional design with pre-test, post-test survey method to quantitatively analyze community-dwelling older adults’ knowledge on medication-related fall risk. The persons taking the survey were community dwelling older adults, 65 years of age and older, living in the greater Tucson and Phoenix areas. Data was obtained through an online Qualtrics questionnaire between February 1, 2016 and February 1, 2017. The survey respondents answered questions regarding prescription and OTC medications associated with fall risk. For the questions they answered incorrectly, an online educational intervention tailored to older adults was provided immediately. The knowledge assessment of the missed questions was repeated after the online education to detect the effectiveness of the intervention. Results: Questionnaires were completed by 302 community-dwelling older adults. The mean age of the participants was 79 (range 65 to > 96), and majority were women (61.2%). A majority of respondents (53.87%) reported falling once in the last 5 years. Of the total participants, 50% were taking between 5 and 9 prescribed medications and 56% taking 0 to 4 OTC medications. The primary outcome of this study is that online education was effective in educating community dwelling older adults on medication-related fall risk. Patients whose pharmacist had previously educated them did not directly correlate with better performance on the pretest than those who did not receive counseling. Participants that received online education during the survey improved their score from 69% before education to 84% post education. Conclusions: The online educational intervention on medication-related fall among older adults was effective and informative. Such educational strategy may be used by pharmacists to educate older patients using medications that may increase fall risks.
    • Awareness of Medication-Related Fall Risk: a Survey of Community-Dwelling Older Adults

      Lee, Jeannie; Leonetti, Gia; Lee, Jeannie; College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona (The University of Arizona., 2014)
      Specific Aims: To assess older adults’ knowledge of medications associated with an increased risk of falls and to evaluate the impact of pharmacist counseling on knowledge of medication-related fall risk. Subjects: Community-dwelling adults 60 and older. Methods: Data were collected using an online questionnaire consisting of 15 knowledge-based items to determine awareness of medication-related fall risk, four items to determine pharmacist counseling experience, fall history, and number of medications taken, and two items to collect demographic information (age and gender). Main Results: Two hundred and six community-dwelling older adults (mean age = 69.07 years, SD = 5.59) participated in the study by completing all or part of the questionnaire. The number of older adults who reported having fallen within the last five years was 90 (43.7%). The knowledge-based portion of the questionnaire was completed in its entirety by 162 older adults (80 males, 81 females, one unreported gender; mean age = 68.7 years, SD = 5.12). One hundred and nineteen of 162 (73.5%) questionnaire respondents scored below 70% on the knowledge assessment (mean score 49.3%, SD = 26.8). The 12 respondents (7.6%) who reported having received counseling from a pharmacist regarding medication-related fall risk scored significantly higher on the knowledge assessment compared to the 145 respondents who did not (mean score 61.66% versus 48.09%, p = 0.01). Conclusion: A majority of community-dwelling older adults lacked knowledge of medications associated with an increased risk of falling. However, those who had been counseled by a pharmacist demonstrated greater awareness of medication-related fall risk. Thus, pharmacist counseling of older adults regarding medications and fall risk should be promoted.
    • An Interactive Approach to Educate Older Adults on Fall Safety & Prevention

      Lee, Jeannie; Cook, Andrew; Cook, Rachael; Lee, Jeannie; College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona (The University of Arizona., 2012)
      Specific Aims: The purpose of this study was to test an interactive educational program for older adults on preventing accidental falls. Methods: This was a prospective, descriptive study evaluating the helpfulness of an interactive educational program. English speaking residents were recruited from five independent senior living communities in Arizona. The intervention consisted of a 30-minute interactive PowerPoint presentation followed by a 10-minute question and answer session. Information provided during the presentation focused on information from the CDC and the Fall Prevention Center of Excellence. Participants completed an anonymous questionnaire to rate the helpfulness of the program. The primary dependent variable was overall helpfulness of the educational session. Other variables included: intention of changing future behavior related to preventing falls, whether participants would recommend the program to others, participant perception of gained knowledge, change in fear of falling, and interest in meeting with pharmacist to discuss medications. Categorical data was analyzed by calculating frequencies and percentages and continuous data by calculating means and SDs. A t-test for independent groups was used to compare men and women. Main Results: A total of 93 individuals attended the presentations. Out of 81 completed surveys, 5 did not indicate gender, 7 additional did not indicate age, and 6 were over 89 years of age. Demographic data for the men and women was similar. 90% of participants indicated that the program was either "very helpful" or "moderately helpful". 92% of participants responded “absolutely yes” or “likely” that they would recommend the program. No participants strongly disagreed that they had a better understanding of fall risks or medications that increase fall risk. 87% of participants responded “absolutely yes” or “likely” that they plan to increase daily exercise . 42% of participants said it was “not likely” that they plan to make changes in their living environment. Conclusions: An interactive educational program on fall safety and prevention is helpful for older adults. As one of the most widely accessible health care providers, pharmacists and pharmacy students are well suited to provide patient education and improve outcomes. The results of this study provide preliminary data supporting the usefulness of a patient education program on fall safety prevention administered by pharmacy students.    
    • An interactive approach to educate older adults on fall safety & prevention

      Lee, Jeannie; Cook, Andrew; Cook, Rachael; College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona (The University of Arizona., 2012)
      Specific Aims: The purpose of this study was to test an interactive educational program for older adults on preventing accidental falls. Methods: This was a prospective, descriptive study evaluating the helpfulness of an interactive educational program. English speaking residents were recruited from five independent senior living communities in Arizona. The intervention consisted of a 30-minute interactive PowerPoint presentation followed by a 10-minute question and answer session. Information provided during the presentation focused on information from the CDC and the Fall Prevention Center of Excellence. Participants completed an anonymous questionnaire to rate the helpfulness of the program. The primary dependent variable was overall helpfulness of the educational session. Other variables included: intention of changing future behavior related to preventing falls, whether participants would recommend the program to others, participant perception of gained knowledge, change in fear of falling, and interest in meeting with pharmacist to discuss medications. Categorical data was analyzed by calculating frequencies and percentages and continuous data by calculating means and SDs. A t-test for independent groups was used to compare men and women. Main Results: A total of 93 individuals attended the presentations. Out of 81 completed surveys, 5 did not indicate gender, 7 additional did not indicate age, and 6 were over 89 years of age. Demographic data for the men and women was similar. 90% of participants indicated that the program was either "very helpful" or "moderately helpful". 92% of participants responded “absolutely yes” or “likely” that they would recommend the program. No participants strongly disagreed that they had a better understanding of fall risks or medications that increase fall risk. 87% of participants responded “absolutely yes” or “likely” that they plan to increase daily exercise . 42% of participants said it was “not likely” that they plan to make changes in their living environment. Conclusions: An interactive educational program on fall safety and prevention is helpful for older adults. As one of the most widely accessible health care providers, pharmacists and pharmacy students are well suited to provide patient education and improve outcomes. The results of this study provide preliminary data supporting the usefulness of a patient education program on fall safety prevention administered by pharmacy students.