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dc.contributor.authorLin, Xiaojun
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-23T02:09:04Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-23T02:09:04Zen
dc.date.issued1995en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/596974en
dc.description.abstractFor many developing countries, a major problem is the challenge of preserving cultural integrity in the face of modernization. On the one hand, these countries have a common goal to develop their national economy and improve standards of living for their people. On the other hand, they need to protect the integrity of the indigenous culture during the process of development which itself often brings in external influences and new lifestyles. Modernization and development require technologies, resources and materials which come from trade and an open economical policy strongly influenced by western culture. Modern western civilization strongly influences the societies, economics and social relations in many developing countries, and can cause major changes in the way of life. As a developing country, China is facing that great challenge today: Is it possible to pursue modernization and at the same time maintain the integrity of culture? This challenge confronts not only scholars and policy makers, but developers, architects and the residents of the communities themselves.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author or the department.en
dc.titleAdaptive Reuse: A Proper Way for Chinese Architectural Preservationen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en
dc.contributor.chairGreen, Elleryen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
dc.contributor.committeememberGreen, Elleryen
dc.contributor.committeememberMatter, Fred S.en
dc.contributor.committeememberYoklic, Martinen
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitectureen
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en
dc.description.noteCollege of Architecture provided copy for digitization.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture Master's Theses and Reports collections. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the UA Campus Repository at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-26T13:55:19Z
html.description.abstractFor many developing countries, a major problem is the challenge of preserving cultural integrity in the face of modernization. On the one hand, these countries have a common goal to develop their national economy and improve standards of living for their people. On the other hand, they need to protect the integrity of the indigenous culture during the process of development which itself often brings in external influences and new lifestyles. Modernization and development require technologies, resources and materials which come from trade and an open economical policy strongly influenced by western culture. Modern western civilization strongly influences the societies, economics and social relations in many developing countries, and can cause major changes in the way of life. As a developing country, China is facing that great challenge today: Is it possible to pursue modernization and at the same time maintain the integrity of culture? This challenge confronts not only scholars and policy makers, but developers, architects and the residents of the communities themselves.


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