ABOUT THE COLLECTIONS

Several University of Arizona organizations, such as colleges, departments, research and administrative groups, have established collections in the UA Campus Repository to share, archive and preserve unique materials.

These materials range from historical and archival documents, to technical reports, bulletins, community education materials, working papers, and other unique publications.

QUESTIONS?

Please contact Campus Repository Services personnel repository@u.library.arizona.edu with your questions about items in these collections, or if you are affiliated with the University of Arizona and are interested in establishing a collection in the repository. We look forward to working with you.

Sub-communities within this community

Recent Submissions

  • Geologic Map of the western part of the Tucson 30' x 60' Quadrangle and the eastern part of the Silver Bell Mountains 30' x60' Quadrangle, southeastern Arizona

    Pearthree, Philip A.; Richardson, Carson A.; Ferguson, Charles A. (Arizona Geological Survey (Tucson, AZ), 2024-02)
  • Geologic Map of the Casa Grande 30’ x 60’ Quadrangle, west-central Arizona

    Pearthree, Philip A.; Johnson, Bradford J.; Richard, S. M.; Spencer, J. E.; Cook, Joseph P. (Arizona Geological Survey (Tucson, AZ), 2024-02)
  • Geologic Map of the Bottleneck Wash 7.5’ Quadrangle, Mohave County, Arizona

    Thompson, Lisa A.; Gootee, Brian F.; Garcia, Victor H.; Beers, Rebecca L.; Pearthree, Philip A.; Richardson, Carson A. (Arizona Geological Survey (Tucson, AZ), 2024-01)
  • Geologic Map of the southern half of the Tom Brown Canyon 7.5’ Quadrangle, Mohave County, Arizona

    Johnson, Bradford J.; Gootee, Brian F.; Beers, Rebecca L. (Arizona Geological Survey (Tucson, AZ), 2024-02)
  • Geologic Map of the Dean Peak 7.5 quadrangle, Mohave County, Arizona

    Garcia, Victor H.; Thompson, Lisa A.; Richardson, Carson A.; Johnson, Bradford J. (Arizona Geological Survey (Tucson, AZ), 2024-02)
  • Request for Section 18 emergency use of Endigo® ZCX insecticide to control the palestriped flea beetle (Systena blanda) in guayule fields in the state of Arizona

    Ellsworth, Peter C; Peterson, Jack; University of Arizona, Department of Agriculture; Arizona Department of Agriculture (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-03-22)
    Arizona Section 18 specific exemption request to authorize the use of Endigo® ZCX insecticide (EPA Reg. No. 100-1458) to control palestriped flea beetle in guayule.
  • Arizona Section 18 Request for Endigo ZCX Use in Guayule Addendum

    Ellsworth, Peter C; Pier, Naomi; Peterson, Jack; University of Arizona, Department of Entomology; Arizona Department of Agriculture (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-04-19)
    Support for Arizona’s Section 18 request for use of Endigo ZCX for the control of palestriped flea beetle for protection of guayule, this addendum is to clarify and augment the application submitted in March 2023.
  • State Operating Budget Book FY22

    University of Arizona (The University of Arizona (Tucson, Arizona), 2022)
  • Geologic Map of the Pilgrim Wash 7 ½’ Quadrangle, Mohave County, Arizona

    Gootee, Brian F.; Beers, Rebecca L.; Pearthree, Philip A.; Thompson, Lisa A.; Johnson, Bradford J. (Arizona Geological Survey (Tucson, AZ), 2024-02)
  • Geologic Map of the Aubrey Peak 7 ½’ Quadrangle, Mohave County, Arizona

    Richardson, Carson A.; Garcia, Victor H.; Thompson, Lisa A.; Cook, Joseph P. (Arizona Geological Survey (Tucson, AZ), 2024-02)
  • Geologic Map of the eastern half of the Hibernia Peak 7 ½’ Quadrangle, Mohave County, Arizona

    Garcia, Victor H.; Thompson, Lisa A. (Arizona Geological Survey (Tucson, AZ), 2024-02)
  • Cotton Insecticide Use Guide: Knowing and Balancing Risks

    Bordini, Isadora; Fournier, A.; Naranjo, Steven E.; Pier, Naomi; Ellsworth, Peter C; University of Arizona, Department of Entomology; USDA-ARS (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2024-02-02)
    Many factors must be considered when choosing an insecticide, such as cost, efficacy, risk of resistance, and safety to non-target organisms. This Cotton Insecticide Use Guide summarizes the diverse risks of insecticides used to control three pests, helping you make well informed pest management decisions.
  • State Operating Budget Book FY23

    University of Arizona (The University of Arizona (Tucson, Arizona), 2023)
  • Arizona Geology Newsletter v.44 no.1 - Winter 2023

    Youberg, A.M.; McGuire, Luke A.; Beers, R.L.; Gorr, Alexander; Pearthree, P.A. (Arizona Geological Survey (Tucson, AZ), 2023-12-20)
  • Overcoming Technology Barriers, Particularly for Historically Underrepresented Students

    Teetor, Travis; Huff-Eibl, Robyn; University of Arizona Libraries (Association of Research Libraries, 2022-11)
    This paper describes efforts at the University of Arizona Libraries to improve access to internet and technology during the pandemic and we continue to adapt to an ongoing hybrid instructional modality. We highlight how our institution leveraged campus data and new partnerships to better meet student’ basic technology needs, particularly for underrepresented and first-generation students. The University of Arizona Libraries analyzed anonymized student demographic data, including race/ethnicity, first generation student status, and Pell grant recipients to determine how existing service utilization aligned with the campus population. The initial data analysis and establishment of new campus partnerships has been completed, and we are in process of evaluating and refining our approach. This foundational work has provided us with new ideas for ways to reach more students in need and form additional unions with groups on campus. Additionally, we are awaiting a decision on a National Telecommunications and Information Administration grant that could increase access to technology for students throughout the state while also expanding partnerships. As literature suggests, not all internet access is created equal and students often rely on outdated technology particularly when they are unaware of educational resources. Long-term goals include further linking student access to technology so that it positively impacts overall retention and success. Funding is key to providing the amount of technology needed to accommodate the hybrid learning models that students currently work in. Technology has become a basic need for students to successfully participate in learning. Thus, it is important that we continue to increase funds for technology in the form of grants, partnerships and endowments.
  • Non-target Effects of Insecticides in Cotton

    Ellsworth, Peter C; Bordini, Isadora; Pier, Naomi; Department of Entomology, University of Arizona (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-11-15)
    Handout reviewing 2023 cotton season trials, including a discussion on historical trends in insect control, Plinazolin and Sefina usage in Arizona cotton, ThryvOn cotton research, and early season insect control options. Handout was provided during the field tour during the 13th Annual Central Arizona Farmer Field Day held on November 15, 2023.
  • Reshaping Library IT to Support Student Success

    Chang, Steven J.; Mayhew, David; University of Arizona (2023-10-11)
    Student success at the University of Arizona is supported by several departments. Previously these units were scattered across campus. Students who used services from more than one department would often have to go to multiple locations. The Student Success District was largely conceived to make it more convenient for students to access the services that they need. Construction began in 2019 to transform a nine-acre section of campus into a district that included three existing buildings, the Main Library, the Albert B. Weaver Science-Engineering Library, and Bear Down Gym. The addition of the new Bartlett Academic Success Center would round out the concept. As described on its website, "Outdoor patios and walkways become more than connections between buildings; they provide unique spaces for everything from collaboration to meditation...the Student Success District is the place that drives students’ 24/7 development through an array of student support services and spaces based on collaborative, hands-on learning with deep technological engagement" (https://successdistrict.arizona.edu/home/about-project). Today, students at the University of Arizona can go to a one-stop shop to seek advising (A Center), get tutoring (Think Tank), learn success strategies (Thrive), and prepare for employment (Student Engagement and Career Development). They can also work with classmates at any of the multitude of study spaces, get a quick workout at the newest Campus Recreation facility, or grab a bite to eat at the local micro-market. For the University of Arizona Libraries (UAL) the nascence of the Student Success District provided an opportunity to reimagine its role in student success. It has resulted in major renovations and a significant expansion in services. Students can use state-of-the-art training facilities, borrow technology for their course work, and work on group projects in rooms equipped for remote collaboration. UAL’s transformation into a hub for student success resources has brought it national recognition. Recently, the District and UAL were featured in EdTech Magazine. This October, UAL will be hosting the Designing Libraries X conference. To keep pace with the UAL’s rapid evolution, UAL’s Technology Strategy and Services department (TeSS) is undergoing its own transformation. The District introduced new technologies to the UAL which requires TeSS staff to rapidly become proficient with new skill sets. An expanded and growing portfolio requires TeSS to grow its own department, both to support the additional work as well as to onboard new expertise. As the UAL’s portfolio changes, TeSS is working with stakeholders to introduce user-centric tools that support the technology.
  • Opening the Pandemic Portal to Re-Imagine Paid Sick Leave for Immigrant Workers

    Milczarek-Desai, Shefali; University of Arizona, James E. Rogers College of Law (California Law Review, 2023)
    The COVID-19 pandemic has spotlighted the crisis low-wage immigrant and migrant (im/migrant) workers face when caught in the century-long collision between immigration enforcement and workers’ rights. Im/migrant workers toil in key industries, from health care to food production, that many now associate with laudable buzzwords such as “frontline” and “essential.” But these industries conceal jobs that pay little, endanger workers’ health and safety, and have high rates of legal violations by employers. Im/migrant workers usually do not benefit from employment and labor law protections, including paid sick leave. This has proven deadly during the pandemic. When im/migrants show up to work ill, they endanger not only themselves but risk transmission to co-workers, customers, patients, and the public at large. This has been starkly illustrated in nursing homes, which rely heavily on im/migrant labor and have been the locus of nearly one third of all coronavirus deaths. The pandemic presents an opportunity to analyze why and how existing paid sick leave laws fail im/migrant workers. It is also a portal to re-imagine paid sick time in a way that will benefit im/migrant workers, and by extension, a nation facing labor shortages and high worker turnover as demand for goods and services rises. This Article is the first to scrutinize paid sick leave laws through the lenses of critical race, movement, and health law theories. It argues that existing paid sick leave laws fail im/migrant workers because they ignore these workers’ social and economic situations and singularly focus on workers’ rights rather than collective well-being. Drawing from critical race, movement, and health law frameworks, this Article situates paid sick leave within a public health matrix based on mutual aid. It argues that when paid sick leave laws are drafted and enforced in a manner informed by workers’ lived experiences and contextualized within a broader public health conversation, employment and labor protections can better safeguard im/migrant workers and the health of the nation. Additionally, the proposed solution will reduce tensions between immigration enforcement and workers’ rights.
  • Asian Longhorned Tick, an Invasive Tick in the United States

    Li, Shujuan (Lucy); Gouge, Dawn H.; Walker, Kathleen; Fournier, Alfred J. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2019-03)
    The Asian longhorned tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis, is also known as the cattle tick or bush tick. It is native to East Asia: China, Korea, Japan, and well established in Australia and New Zealand. It is also an invasive tick species in the United States (U.S.). This tick is a serious pest of livestock and wildlife in several countries (Heath 2016, Guan et al. 2010). If the Asian longhorned tick becomes established in Arizona, it could become a serious threat to livestock, wildlife, and pets.
  • Pointleaf Manzanita (‘Little Apple’) Arctostaphylos pungens

    Barton, David R.; Howery, Larry D. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2019-02)
    Arizona residents who live in the desert valleys with its surrounding mountains (sometimes called “sky islands”) are a fortunate bunch. Biodiversity of plants and animals throughout our state is among the best anywhere on earth. We have a seemingly endless supply of flora and fauna to photograph, sketch, collect, and admire and for the most part we are hindered in our interactions only by our imaginations. However, for those of us who try and incorporate our favorite local plant into our home landscape, we are limited by the specific requirements that each plant must have to thrive and grow.

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