ABOUT THE COLLECTIONS

Several University of Arizona organizations, such as colleges, departments, research and administrative groups, have established collections in the UA Campus Repository to share, archive and preserve unique materials.

These materials range from historical and archival documents, to technical reports, bulletins, community education materials, working papers, and other unique publications.

QUESTIONS?

Please contact Campus Repository Services personnel repository@u.library.arizona.edu with your questions about items in these collections, or if you are affiliated with the University of Arizona and are interested in establishing a collection in the repository. We look forward to working with you.

Sub-communities within this community

Recent Submissions

  • Surficial geologic map of the Eloy North Quadrangle, Pinal County, Arizona

    Jackson, Garrett (Arizona Geological Survey (Tucson, AZ), 2022)
  • Surficial geologic map of the Eloy South Quadrangle, Pinal County, Arizona

    Jackson, Garrett (Arizona Geological Survey (Tucson, AZ), 2022)
  • Surficial Geologic Map of the Picacho Reservoir Quadrangle, Pinal County, Arizona

    Jackson, Garrett (Arizona Geological Survey (Tucson, AZ), 2022)
  • Surficial geologic map of the Newman Peak Quadrangle, Pinal County, Arizona

    Jackson, Garrett (Arizona Geological Survey (Tucson, AZ), 2022)
  • Surficial geologic map of the Casa Grande Quadrangle, Pinal County, Arizona

    Jackson, Garrett (Arizona Geological Survey (Tucson, AZ), 2022)
  • Geologic Map of the Ninetysix Hills SE Quadrangle, Pinal County, Arizona

    Skotnicki, Steven J. (Arizona Geological Survey (Tucson, AZ), 2022)
  • Geologic Map of the Ninetysix Hills NE Quadrangle, Pinal County, Arizona

    Skotnicki, Steven J. (Arizona Geological Survey (Tucson, AZ), 2022)
  • Geologic Map of the Ninetysix Hills SW Quadrangle, Pinal County, Arizona

    Skotnicki, Steven J. (Arizona Geological Survey (Tucson, AZ), 2022)
  • Geologic Map of the Ninetysix Hills NW Quadrangle, Pinal County, Arizona

    Skotnicki, Steven J. (Arizona Geological Survey (Tucson, AZ), 2022)
  • 2022 Arizona Major Mines, Development Projects, Past Producers, and Defined Deposits

    Richardson, Carson; Arizona Geological Survey (Arizona Geological Survey (Tucson, AZ), 2022-11-14)
  • Guayule Weed Management During Establishment in Arizona – September 2021

    McCloskey, William B.; Evancho, Blase; Pier, Naomi; University of Arizona School of Plant Sciences; University of Arizona Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2021-12)
    Guayule is a desert-adapted crop that is grown using agronomic practices like those used to grow cotton. Guayule seed is planted shallow in dry soil on beds and then irrigated to germinate the seed. Guayule seedlings are small and grow slowly making them poor competitors with weeds. Weeds must be actively managed for several months after planting until the crop canopy closes and guayule becomes very competitive against weeds.
  • Palestriped Flea Beetle Control During Guayule Stand Establishment: Use the Right Special Local Needs Label!

    Ellsworth, Peter C; Pier, Naomi; University of Arizona Department of Entomology & Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2022-10-04)
    Special Local Needs labels are issued by the State, subject to review by EPA. The Arizona Department of Agriculture has approved a new label for Bifenture® EC for use against palestriped flea beetles in guayule. This new label replaces three prior labels that were available only for a short time in the Spring of 2022.
  • Crafting the Internship: An Empathy-Driven Approach

    Blakiston, Rebecca; University of Arizona Libraries, University of Arizona (Association of College & Research Libraries, 2022)
    At their core, internships are for student learning and career preparation. Students aim to get hands-on experience in a professional environment, building specific competencies and skills and deepening their understanding of a particular field and potential career path after graduation. At the University of Arizona, students are encouraged and often required to complete real-world experiences as part of their degree programs. The 100% Engagement initiative, an outcome of the university’s strategic plan in 2013, called for “100 percent of our students to have the opportunity to engage in integrating and applying their knowledge through real-world experiential learning.” 1 In response to this initiative, the School of Information added an internship requirement for its master’s in library and information science degree in 2015.2 The school has approximately two hundred students in its program, with the majority being distant students who are seeking local or remote opportunities. Even students who aren’t required to complete an internship as part of their program often seek one out as a way to supplement course instruction and strengthen their qualifications and future job prospects. 184 Chapter 11 Most graduate-level internships hosted at the University of Arizona Libraries are designed as structured learning experiences, so they are unpaid and compensated through academic credit. The time and effort required for a student to complete an internship is equivalent to a three-credit course, which is nine hours per week during a regular (fall or spring) semester. Departments across the library host interns regularly, including Student Learning and Engagement, Research Engagement, the Health Sciences Library, and the University of Arizona Press. The majority of library interns are graduate students seeking master’s degrees from the School of Information, though interns have come from a range of disciplines and have also included high school students, undergraduate students, and PhD students. Some of our library internships are publicly posted, competitive positions, whereas others are individually tailored to specific students. This book chapter focuses on those tailored experiences.
  • Making Whitefly & Predator Counts

    Vandervoet, Timothy F.; Ellsworth, Peter C.; Brown, Lydia; Fournier, Alfred; Naranjo, Steven E.; New Zealand Plant and Food Research; University of Arizona; USDA-ARS (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2019-01 r)
    Guidelines for sampling whiteflies and identifying predators critical in their management. Includes predator-prey tables that provide guidelines that aid in management decisions of whiteflies.
  • Predator “Thresholds”

    Ellsworth, Peter C.; Pier, Naomi; Fournier, Alfred; Naranjo, Steven E.; Vandervoet, Timothy F.; University of Arizona; USDA-ARS; New Zealand Plant and Food Research (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2019-01 r)
    Natural enemy conservation is central to pest avoidance in cotton. The benefit of predators for controlling whiteflies should not be overlooked. Today’s growers can use selective technologies that conserve predators, which play a critical (& free) role in controlling whiteflies. We don’t normally think of predators as having “thresholds”, but new research identifies critical levels of predators that impact economic spray decisions for whiteflies.
  • In 7 Minutes or Less!

    Ellsworth, Peter C; Brown, Lydia; Castro, Gilberto; Naranjo, Steven E.
    In 7 minutes or less and just 7 steps, you can determine the size and structure of Bemisia tabaci populations in a cotton field. With this information, more precise and appropriate control decisions can be made.
  • Cotton Insecticide Use Guide: Knowing and Balancing Risks

    Bordini, Isadora; Fournier, A.; Naranjo, Steven E.; Pier, Naomi; Ellsworth, Peter C; University of Arizona; USDA-ARS (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2020-07-11)
    Many factors must be considered when choosing an insecticide, such as cost, efficacy, risk of resistance, and safety to non-target organisms. This Cotton Insecticide Use Guide summarizes the diverse risks of insecticides used to control three pests, helping you make well informed pest management decisions
  • Integrating Chemical & Biological Control in Cotton

    Ellsworth, Peter C; Bordini, Isadora; Pier, Naomi; Naranjo, Steven E.; University of Arizona, Department of Entomology & Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2022-07-15)
    Biological control works when chemical controls are carefully selected so that key predator groups are conserved. Big-eyed bugs, Collops beetles, crab spiders, lacewing larvae, minute pirate bugs and Drapetis flies are the key predators in the cotton system. They can effectively hold whiteflies in check when their numbers are high enough. Includes updated whitefly predator threshold tables.
  • Geologic Map of the Little Horn Mountains 30' X 60' Quadrangle, West-Central Arizona

    Spencer, Jon E.; Pearthree, Philip A.; Demsey, Karen A.; Thompson, Lisa A.; Snellen, Haley L.; Korroch, Kraig M.; Theime, Jennifer P.; Richard, Stephen M.; Arizona Geological Survey (Arizona Geological Survey (Tucson, AZ), 2022-07-13)
  • Utilizando los Predadores en Algodón - FMC22

    Ellsworth, Peter C; Pier, Naomi; Fournier, Alfred; Naranjo, Steven; University of Arizona; USDA-ARS, ALARC (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2022-06)
    La guía del inspector acompañante para “Making Whitefly & Predator Counts”. Esta guía portátil proporciona instrucciones para el muestreo de mosca blanca y predators. La tablas proporcionan una guía para tomar decisiones sobre cuando fumigar para manejar eficazmente mosca blanca. Disponible tanto en inglés como en español.

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