ABOUT THE COLLECTIONS

Several University of Arizona organizations, such as colleges, departments, research and administrative groups, have established collections in the UA Campus Repository to share, archive and preserve unique materials.

These materials range from historical and archival documents, to technical reports, bulletins, community education materials, working papers, and other unique publications.

QUESTIONS?

Please contact the Office of Digital Innovation & Stewardship at repository@u.library.arizona.edu with your questions about items in these collections, or if you are affiliated with the University of Arizona and are interested in establishing a collection in the repository. We look forward to working with you.

Sub-communities within this community

Collections in this community

Recent Submissions

  • Social Determinants of Latina/o Sleep Health: Insights and Implications for Behavioral Interventions

    Alcántara, Carmela; Columbia University (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2019-01-25)
    Sleep is increasingly recognized as an important behavioral and public health issue for all in the United States (US). Yet, Latina/o sleep health is understudied despite the fact that Latina/os compose 16.3% of the US population, and that sleep problems are prevalent among Latina/os. Additionally, racial/ethnic and language-based disparities in access to safe and effective behavioral health interventions for prevalent sleep-wake disorders persist. In this talk, I will draw from frameworks in psychology, public health, social work, and medicine to discuss recent evidence from my program of research on the relative association of sociocultural stressors and general psychosocial stress with various dimensions of subjectively- and objectively-measured sleep among Latina/os, and discuss implications for behavioral sleep intervention science. Second, I will describe formative work behind an ongoing mixed-methods Hybrid effectiveness-implementation randomized controlled trial that tests a culturally adapted self-guided digital version of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia versus usual care in Spanish-speaking Latina/o primary care patients. Finally, I will conclude by discussing future mechanistic and ecological research on the bi-directional relationships between sleep, stress, and self-regulatory processes among Latina/os.
  • Is Cancer Diagnosis Really A "Teachable Moment" for Smoking Cessation?

    Burriss, Jessica L.; University of Kentucky (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2020-01-31)
    Most people assume cancer diagnosis functions as a “teachable moment,” that is, a major life event that triggers a significant increase in people’s motivation to adopt healthy behaviors (e.g., regular exercise, diet high in fresh fruits/veggies) and cease unhealthy behaviors (e.g., heavy alcohol use, medication noncompliance). Conceivably, the power of cancer diagnosis to serve as a “teachable moment” should extend to smoking behavior wherein cancer patients would be expected to quit smoking immediately upon diagnosis and remain abstinent for the balance of their lives. In reality, however, cancer survivors are estimated to smoke at a rate that is equal to or greater than the general population, with subgroups of cancer survivors smoking at much higher rates (40-50%). In my work, I aim to determine if, how, and for whom cancer diagnosis does indeed function as a “teachable moment” for smoking, with a central goal of more fully understanding the naturalistic process by which smoking cessation occurs after a new cancer diagnosis. In this talk, I will examine the interplay between cancer diagnosis and smoking behavior through several different, but complementary research methods, including intensive longitudinal data collection, concurrent mixed methods, randomized clinical trials, and implementation science. Ultimately, this line of research has the goal of promoting smoking cessation among the most vulnerable cancer survivors, including those who report little to no intention to quit and those who are faced with high levels of unmet social support needs.
  • An Illustrated Guide to Arizona Weeds

    Parker, Kittie F. (University of Arizona Press (Tucson, AZ), 1972)
  • Geologic Map of the Blythe 7.5' Quadrangle, La Paz County, Arizona and Riverside County, California

    Block, D.; Gootee, B.F.; House, P.K.; Pearthree, P.A.; Arizona Geological Survey; U.S. Geological Survey (Arizona Geological Survey (Tucson, AZ), 2019-12)
  • Faculty Senate Minutes November 4 2019

    University of Arizona Faculty Senate (Tucson, AZ), 2019-11-04
  • Faculty Senate Minutes October 7 2019

    University of Arizona Faculty Senate (Tucson, AZ), 2019-10-07
  • If You're Young and Black...A report of a summer program with black male youth in Tucson, Arizona, with recommendations for program development

    Brown, Charles C.; Bradish, Damaris (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1971-05)
  • Is Youth in Social Turmoil?

    Napier, Clay (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1971-08)
  • Citrus Field Day

    University of Arizona. Cooperative Extension Service; University of Arizona. Agricultural Experiment Station (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1968-10-30)
  • Twelfth annual report on agricultural chemicals

    University of Arizona. Cooperative Extension Service; University of Arizona. Agricultural Experiment Station (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1969-02)
  • Minimum Energy Tillage Systems

    Cannon, Moody D.; Stapleton, Herbert N. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1977)
    Eight years of research in minimum tillage methods included eighteen tests at three locations. Different configurations and depths with a chisel-lister and lister only were compared to conventional tillage with disk, moldboard plow, drag float and lister in a cotton-following- cotton cropping sequence. The effects of tillage methods on soil physical condition determined by soil penetrometer measurements showed no correlation. Sometimes there were significant increases; never were there reductions in yield from chisel-listing. In ii general, there was no advantage to running the chisels deeper than 14 inches beneath the level of the previous year's furrow. Draft-fuel testing showed that preplant tillage by chisel-listing required slightly more than ¼ as much fuel as conventional tillage, and time and labor requirements were proportional to fuel consumption. Because chisel-list tillage leaves the field in a rough and trashy condition, seed placement and covering are difficult, but the extra effort required is compensated through the reduction in fuel energy, time and labor.
  • Eleventh annual report on agricultural chemicals

    University of Arizona. Cooperative Extension Service; University of Arizona. Agricultural Experiment Station (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1968-02)
  • Tenth annual report on agricultural chemicals

    University of Arizona. Cooperative Extension Service; University of Arizona. Agricultural Experiment Station (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1967-02)
  • Factors affecting producer prices for Arizona cotton: 1963 and 1964 seasons

    Firch, Robert S. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-10)
  • 30th Anniversary Report and Citrus Field Day

    University of Arizona. Cooperative Extension Service; University of Arizona. Agricultural Experiment Station (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1972-12-08)
  • Citrus Field Day

    University of Arizona. Cooperative Extension Service; University of Arizona. Agricultural Experiment Station (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1972-12-01)
  • Arizona Cattle Feeders' Day

    University of Arizona. Department of Animal Science; University of Arizona. Agricultural Experiment Station (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1970-05-07)
  • Arizona Cattle Feeders' Day

    University of Arizona. Department of Animal Science; University of Arizona. Agricultural Experiment Station (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1972-05-04)
  • Famine mitigation: proceedings of workshops held in Tucson, Arizona, May 20-May 23, 1991 [and] Berkeley Springs, West Virginia, July 31-August 2, 1991

    University of Arizona. Office of Arid Lands Studies; Famine Mitigation Activity Support Project (U.S.); United States. Department of Agriculture. Office of International Cooperation and Development. (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1991)

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