• Analysis of hydrologic data collected by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management 1987-1995 and recommendations for future monitoring programs

      Sharma, Vandana; Mac Nish, Robert D.; Maddock, Thomas, III; Department of Hydrology & Water Resources, The University of Arizona; Arizona Research Laboratory for Riparian Studies (Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1997)
      The purpose of this study was to establish a more efficient monitoring program for the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area (SPRNCA). This report analyzes data on stream flow measurements taken at nine locations on the San Pedro river and one location on the Babocomari river and ground water levels in eighteen wells collected by the BLM over the period from 1987 to 1995 and discusses possible causes for trends and anomalies in the data. The report also recommends future data collection and analytical efforts. All of the stream discharge data and some of the groundwater levels were collected at discrete and unsystematic intervals, and further, the streamflow measurements may not have been collected at the same location at each site. Surface water flow was measured by a Marsh- McBirney flow meter.
    • Effluent recharge to the Upper Santa Cruz River floodplain aquifer, Santa Cruz county, Arizona

      Scott, Paul S.; Mac Nish, Robert D.; Maddock, Thomas, III; Department of Hydrology & Water Resources, The University of Arizona; Arizona Research Laboratory for Riparian Studies (Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1997)
      The City of Nogales, Arizona, is in the Santa Cruz Active Management Area and is subject to the assured water supply and conservation mandates of the 1980, Groundwater Management Act (State of Arizona, 1980). The primary water supply for both Nogales Arizona, and Nogales, Sonora, (commonly referred to as Ambos Nogales) is groundwater pumped from the shallow alluvial aquifers which underlie the Upper Santa Cruz River in Arizona and Mexico, and its tributaries (principally Nogales Wash and Potrero Creek). Nogales, Sonora also obtains water from the Los Alisos Basin, which is south of the Santa Cruz Basin in Mexico (Carruth, 1995). The NIWTP provides wastewater treatment for Ambos Nogales, and discharges treated wastewater to the Upper Santa Cruz River near the confluence with Nogales Wash and Sonoita Creek. The discharge of effluent creates an intermittent stream from the NIWTP outfall for approximately 13 river miles to Tubac, Arizona. The conservation mandates of the 1980, Groundwater Management Act (State of Arizona, 1980) require the City of Nogales, Arizona to prove the existence of a 100-year water supply as a condition for future growth. The Act also allows Nogales, Arizona to receive recharge credits for the portion of effluent that recharges the aquifer underlying the Santa Cruz River. The recharge credits will be used by the City of Nogales as partial proof of a 100-year water supply (Carruth, 1995).
    • Investigations into the availability of additional water supplies and water storage areas for the Santa Cruz active management area, Arizona

      Pranschke, Stephanie; Mac Nish, Robert D.; Department of Hydrology & Water Resources, The University of Arizona (Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002)
      The desert climate of Southern Arizona coupled with the overdraft of its groundwater resources, led to the passing of the 1980, Groundwater Management Act. The Act mandates the creation of management plans in designated areas of heavy overdraft. Of the four initial Active Management Areas (AMAs, three had management plans that were designed to secure sustainable yield of the aquifer by 2025. In 1994, the Arizona legislature created a fifth AMA by designating the southern part of the Tucson AMA as the Santa Cruz AMA (SCAMA). The purpose for this subdivision was to facilitate the bi- national negotiations for coordinated water resource management in this internationally shared basin. Additionally, the SCAMA is to coordinate the management of surface water and groundwater rights for public health, safety and welfare. A.R.S. § 45-411.04. The legislature also assigned the SCAMA the management goals of maintaining safe -yield conditions and preventing long -term declines in local water table levels. A.R.S. § 45- 562(C) (ADWR, 1999). This study is a result of a grant award from the 1999 Augmentation and Conservation Assistance Program in an attempt to investigate the availability of additional water supplies and water storage areas within the SCAMA.