• Improving Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates in an Urban Community Health Center

      Seelbaugh, Joseph; The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix; Brite, Kathleen (The University of Arizona., 2016-03-25)
      Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer‐related deaths. Although screening has been shown to significantly reduce mortality associated with the disease, CRC screening rates remain low, especially among many minority groups. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an organized screening regimen improves screening in a community clinic serving patients with low baseline CRC screening rates. The study was conducted at the Wesley Health Center, a Federally Qualified Health Clinic (FQHC) that serves a predominantly uninsured patient population. Participants were patients aged 50 – 75 years who visited the clinic for routine primary care. A team of clinicians and support staff at the Wesley Health Center developed a systematic CRC screening protocol with interventions tailored for the clinic. Following the implementation of the screening regimen, screening rates among the targeted population were examined over a one‐year period and compared to a recent one‐year period previous to protocol implementation. The primary outcome was the change in CRC screening rates in the intervention group compared to screening rates prior to implementation of the protocol. Results of the study showed CRC screening rates of 45.6% over the trial period, as compared to 13.7% prior to screening interventions, a statistically significant difference (p < 0.001). The investigation provides valuable information regarding the use of practical strategies to increase CRC screening in community health care settings.