• Implementation of a Pediatric Stroke Team: Outcomes and Resource Utilization

      Esque, Jacquelin; The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix; Buttram, Sandra (The University of Arizona., 2016-04)
      Background and Significance: Pediatric stroke is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In an effort to improve diagnosis and patient management, we established a Pediatric Stroke Team (PST) available 24/7 in January 2012. Outcomes of patients before and after PST implementation are reported. Methods: Retrospective review of pediatric stroke patients (Jan 2009 ‐Dec 2012) at Phoenix Children’s Hospital in Phoenix, Arizona. Primary outcomes assessed were Glasgow Outcome Scale‐Extended Pediatric Revision (GOS‐E Peds) and discharge disposition. Hospital length of stay, time to neuroimaging, stroke therapies, and adherence to neuroprotective strategies (sodium, glucose, temperature) were also evaluated. Data were analyzed by Wilcoxon rank sum, Fisher’s exact, and chi‐square. Results: There were 64 patients pre‐PST and 30 post‐PST. Overall, GOS‐E Peds was improved post‐PST 2 [1, 3] vs. pre‐PST 3 [2, 6] (p = 0.004) with no change if deaths were excluded (post‐PST (2 [1, 2]) vs. pre‐PST (2 [1, 6]) (p = 0.030)). Discharge to home was more common in the post‐PST group (p = 0.018). Definitive neuroimaging tended to occur more quickly post‐PST 2h [1, 2.6] compared to pre‐PST 4.7h [1.3, 16.5] (p =0.16). Post‐PST patients appropriately received heparin (23%) more often than pre‐PST (6%) (p = 0.034) and had fewer episodes of hyperglycemia (3%) compared to pre‐PST (20%) (p = 0.033). There were no differences in episodes of fever, hyponatremia or hypoglycemia. Conclusions: Availability of a PST improved patient care and outcomes. Time to definitive neuroimaging was decreased, appropriate therapies were administered and adverse events (hyperglycemia) were decreased with PST management. We continue to strive for improved care of pediatric stroke patients.
    • The Proportion of Adolescents Complaining of Anterior Knee Pain with Osteochondritis Dissecans and the Utility of Screening Radiographs in its Diagnosis.

      MacKenzie, James; The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix; Vaughn, Jeffrey M.; Shrader, M. Wade (The University of Arizona., 2016-04-01)
      Osteochondritis dissecans is a rare condition which can cause disabling knee pain in adolescents. Treatment and prognosis hinges upon the stage of the lesion and early detection is paramount 1‐3. Until recently, epidemiologic information regarding OCD in adolescents was unavailable. However in 2013 Kessler et al. demonstrated an incidence of 9.5/100,000 in the general adolescent population 4. Chief complains from patients with OCD usually localize pain to the knee joint line, but less commonly, patients may complain of anterior knee pain. This retrospective chart review looked at the amount of OCD diagnoses in adolescents specifically complaining of anterior knee pain without causative trauma in the years 2009 and 2010 at a major children’s hospital. It was noted that 7.5% of children with this presentation had a diagnosis of OCD. This number was over three orders of magnitude higher than the incidence seen in the general adolescent population as established by Kessler and may support the use of screening radiographs in this subset of patients to detect OCD in its early stages.
    • The Role of Injection Laryngoplasty (IL) in Treating Deep Interarytenoid Notch (DIN) Associated Dysphagia in Young Children

      Frantz, Garrett; The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix; Williams, Dana (The University of Arizona., 2016-04)
      BACKGROUND Deep Interarytenoid Notch (DIN) is the mildest form of laryngotracheoesophageal cleft defect and is frequently found in young children with dysphagia and aspiration. Treatment guidelines are not defined. Injection laryngoplasty (IL) is a surgical procedure injecting polymer gel into the issue around the defect. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of IL in pediatric populations with severe dysphagia and aspiration. METHODS We conducted a pilot retrospective chart review of DIN patients under 36 months who underwent IL at PCH. Severity of dysphagia before and after IL was measured using modified barium swallows (MBS) (scale 0‐10) and documented symptoms. Statistical analysis was done using paired two sample t‐test with a p value of 5 percent. RESULTS Patients with initial MBS above double honey (7) improved an average of 2.6 ±1.38 points while those with initial scores below 7 did not see a statistical change in MBS. At the end of the study period, the final MBS scores for both groups were statistically similar.CONCLUSIONS IL treatment for DIN associated dysphagia results in improvement of MBS scores and symptoms in toddlers with severe aspiration. Careful timing of IL impacts morbidity. Future prospective controlled studies are necessary to evaluate the role of IL and medical interventions in thickener wean and clinical improvement.
    • Skin Disorders Encountered at a Pediatric Homeless Clinic: A Retrospective Chart Review

      Balasuriya, Lilanthi; The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix; O’Haver, Judy (The University of Arizona., 2016-03-23)
      BACKGROUND AND SIGNIFICANCE: Limited information about skin problems in homeless children exists in the current literature. RESEARCH QUESTION: Our objective was to classify the types of skin conditions commonly seen in a pediatric homeless clinic as compared to that of a large tertiary care children’s hospital dermatology clinic. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all children treated by pediatric dermatologists at a homeless clinic, and compared the diagnoses to what was seen at a general pediatric dermatology clinic. RESULTS: There were 100 visits for 75 patients at the homeless clinic during the study period of 33 months. Within the homeless clinic visits, 62% of patient’s reported living in a shelter. In the homeless population the most common diagnoses were atopic dermatitis (31.0%), acne (27.0%), other dermatitis (7.0%), molluscum (6.0%), warts (5.0%) and nevi (4.0%). In the nonhomeless population, the most common diagnoses were atopic dermatitis (19.2%), contact dermatitis (9.7%), hemangioma (9.5%), acne (9.4%), nevus, non‐neoplastic (6.8%) and benign neoplasm of the skin (6.3%). CONCLUSION: Homeless and non‐homeless children suffer from similar conditions such as atopic dermatitis, acne and nevi. With the growing homeless pediatric population and their exposure to unsheltered environments, further studies are needed to investigate the skin conditions affecting this population.
    • The Utility of Hemoglobin A1c in Detecting Prediabetes in Obese Youth

      Srivastava, Sarika; The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix; McClellan, Donald (The University of Arizona., 2016-03-25)
      Introduction. The incidence and prevalence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus has been steadily increasing over the past ten years, and is currently approximately 4.1 per 1000 12‐19 year olds in the US2. This increase has been linked to obesity and a sedentary lifestyle. Prediabetes, in the pediatric population is defined as having a fasting plasma glucose concentration ≥ 100 to 125 mg/dL or 2‐hour glucose concentration during an oral glucose tolerance test ≥ 140 mg/dL but <200 mg/dL. Aims. The goal of this study is to describe the sensitivity and specificity of hemoglobin A1c at various thresholds to identify prediabetes, as defined by impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance; the population included in this study consist of obese youth referred to the Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes at Phoenix Children’s Hospital for weight‐related issues. We anticipate describing various levels of sensitivity and specificity of hemoglobin A1c in comparison with gold standard tests, such that it can be used to propel further studies to ultimately reduce the immense patient burden of fasting in the pediatric population. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cross‐sectional chart review and employed receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of data including but not limited to hemoglobin A1c, fasting plasma glucose, and 2‐hr post‐prandial plasma glucose. The benefits of this study include the potential of reducing the patient burden of fasting prior to examination. This review will determine, if any, the potential value in being able to use hemoglobin A1c clinically to detect prediabetes in pediatric patients; determining this may provide critical information to improve the monitoring and screening of prediabetes. Conclusions. Compared to the gold standards of fasting plasma glucose and oral glucose tolerance tests, we found that hemoglobin A1c had a low sensitivity and specificity for identifying prediabetes.
    • Variability in the Interpretation of Elbow Fractures in Children

      Kraynov, Liliya; The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix; Zebulon, Timothy; Bulloch, Blake (The University of Arizona., 2016-03-25)
      Background and Significance The first physician to encounter a child with an elbow fracture is usually the emergency medicine (EM) physician. Many hospitals may not have access to immediate orthopedic consultation or “real-time” radiology reads, therefore, EM physicians have a great responsibility for an accurate diagnosis. Unfortunately, many EM physicians have little training in pediatric orthopedic injuries. The elbow's anatomy and radiographic features of the growing elbow increase the difficulty in determining an accurate diagnosis and proper treatment. Inaccurate interpretation of elbow fractures in children may lead to unnecessary or improper medical decisions. Accurate interpretation is especially important in rural settings where patients may need transportation to facilities with higher levels of care. Research Question This study aims to survey EM physicians and determine if certain elbow fractures are diagnosed inaccurately more frequently and if some physician characteristics share a relationship with the accuracy of diagnosis of pediatric fractures. The characteristics include area of specialization, annual ED volume, years of experience post residency training, and working in an academic versus non-academic department. Different types of fractures, including type 1 supracondylar, type 2 supracondylar, type 3 supracondylar, medial epicondyle, lateral epicondyle, and olecranon along with uninjured elbows were evaluated to determine if a particular type was misdiagnosed more frequently. Methods A 16-question multiple-choice paper survey was distributed to physicians working in academic and non-academic centers within adult or pediatric emergency departments. Questions included radiographs and asked the physician to determine which fracture existed, if any.Results Lateral epicondyle fractures were the most likely fractures to be misdiagnosed (22.12%), while type 3 supracondylar fractures were the most likely to be accurately diagnosed (95.5%). There was no significant difference in accuracy of diagnosis based on physicians working either in an academic department, non-academic department, or both. Those physicians who were board certified or board eligible in two or more specialties had a higher mean percent correct, as well as those who worked in pediatric emergency medicine. Conclusions While this study served to start clarifying the most frequently misdiagnosed pediatric fractures and whether physicians with particular characteristics were more likely to diagnose fractures accurately, further steady is necessary to draw a definitive conclusion. This study does shed light on which pediatric elbow fractures physicians misdiagnose more frequently. It is important for all emergency medicine physicians to keep in mind the types of fractures that are most commonly misdiagnosed as it can affect medical decision-making. This is an area where additional education about elbow fractures in the developing pediatric elbow may be needed.