• Racial/Ethnic Disparities in HIV Survival Among People Diagnosed with HIV in Arizona, 1998‐2012

      Mun, Elijah; The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix; Gonzalez, Jonathan (The University of Arizona., 2016-03-25)
      Objectives. We described the racial/ethnic disparities in survival among people diagnosed with HIV in Arizona from 1998 to 2012. We determined whether these disparities widened when adjusting for AIDS diagnosis, age at diagnosis, year of diagnosis, and gender. Methods. We compared survival from all causes between Whites and Blacks, Hispanics, Native Americans, Asians, and Multiple/Other races via Kaplan‐Meier survival curves and Cox proportional hazard models controlling for various clinical factors. Results. Multiple/Other races (1.85), Native Americans (1.28), and Blacks (1.19) have statistically significant higher hazard ratios in all‐cause mortality than Whites. When adjusting for AIDS diagnosis, these disparities widened and also showed Hispanics to have greater mortality [Multiple/Other races (2.53), Native Americans (1.44), Blacks (1.43), and Hispanics (1.22)]. Conclusions. Racial/ethnic minorities with HIV, specifically Black, Native Americans, and Multiple races, have significantly decreased overall survival. These disparities widen when considering the AIDS population. Further studies and resources could help identify the cause of these disparities and help generate a solution to diminish the survival gap.