• Evaluation of Skin Cancer Screenings in Tucson, Arizona from 2006‐2013

      Romano, Gianna; The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix; Harris, Robin (The University of Arizona., 2016-03-25)
      Background: One out of every three cancer diagnoses is a skin cancer, and the incidence of both melanoma and non‐melanoma type skin cancers is increasing. Skin cancers, including melanoma, are typically treatable if detected early. However, there is insufficient evidence to support recommendations to establish population based skin cancer screening programs. The specific aims of this study are 1) to evaluate characteristics of participants who attend a community skin cancer screening event and who are referred for follow up due to suspicious lesions, 2) to determine the proportion of participants with suspicious lesions identified at a community skin cancer screening event who complied with a request to visit a dermatologist or primary care physician, and 3) to evaluate attitudes toward sun protection practices, and perceived risk of developing skin cancer among participants who attend a community skin cancer screening and have a suspicious skin lesion. Methods: The Skin Cancer Institute sponsored a series of community skin cancer screening events in Tucson, Arizona from 2006 to 2013. Participants completed an American Academy of Dermatology screening form prior to a skin examination by a dermatologist. Participants with suspicious lesions identified at the examination who agreed to be contacted again received questionnaires 4 months after the initial screening to assess compliance with follow‐up recommendations, and their sun protection practices and risk perceptions. Results: 1979 community members attended the skin cancer screenings. The majority of the participants were Caucasian, females, had blue eyes and brown hair, were college educated, had no prior personal or family history of skin cancer, had health insurance but did not have a regular dermatologist, reported that they had never been to a skin cancer screening before, and stated that without this screening that they would not have their skin examined. 748 (37.8%) of community members were referred and instructed to see a dermatologist for further evaluation of a skin lesion. Of the 441 participants with a suspicious lesion who consented to participate in the follow‐up study, 120 returned a questionnaire; 90 (75%) reported that they followed up with a dermatologist or physician, and 30 (25%) did not. Of the 90 participants who followed up, 53% received a skin biopsy. The self reported diagnoses from the biopsies of the suspicious skin lesions were the following: 1% atypical or dysplastic nevus, 21% actinic keratosis, 16% basal cell carcinoma, 8% squamous cell carcinoma, 2% melanoma, and 38% did not have skin cancer. Conclusions/Impact: This study demonstrated that 38% of community skin cancer screening participants were referred for follow up due to a suspicious skin lesion being identified during a skin cancer screening event. It also appeared that 75% of those who responded to the follow‐up questionnaire complied with the request within four months, although the response rate for the follow‐up questionnaire was low. Therefore, implementing a formal reminder system following the skin cancer screenings may increase the percentage of participants who follow up with a primary care physician or dermatologist after the screening for further evaluation of their suspicious skin lesion.
    • Improving Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates in an Urban Community Health Center

      Seelbaugh, Joseph; The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix; Brite, Kathleen (The University of Arizona., 2016-03-25)
      Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer‐related deaths. Although screening has been shown to significantly reduce mortality associated with the disease, CRC screening rates remain low, especially among many minority groups. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an organized screening regimen improves screening in a community clinic serving patients with low baseline CRC screening rates. The study was conducted at the Wesley Health Center, a Federally Qualified Health Clinic (FQHC) that serves a predominantly uninsured patient population. Participants were patients aged 50 – 75 years who visited the clinic for routine primary care. A team of clinicians and support staff at the Wesley Health Center developed a systematic CRC screening protocol with interventions tailored for the clinic. Following the implementation of the screening regimen, screening rates among the targeted population were examined over a one‐year period and compared to a recent one‐year period previous to protocol implementation. The primary outcome was the change in CRC screening rates in the intervention group compared to screening rates prior to implementation of the protocol. Results of the study showed CRC screening rates of 45.6% over the trial period, as compared to 13.7% prior to screening interventions, a statistically significant difference (p < 0.001). The investigation provides valuable information regarding the use of practical strategies to increase CRC screening in community health care settings.
    • The Proportion of Adolescents Complaining of Anterior Knee Pain with Osteochondritis Dissecans and the Utility of Screening Radiographs in its Diagnosis.

      MacKenzie, James; The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix; Vaughn, Jeffrey M.; Shrader, M. Wade (The University of Arizona., 2016-04-01)
      Osteochondritis dissecans is a rare condition which can cause disabling knee pain in adolescents. Treatment and prognosis hinges upon the stage of the lesion and early detection is paramount 1‐3. Until recently, epidemiologic information regarding OCD in adolescents was unavailable. However in 2013 Kessler et al. demonstrated an incidence of 9.5/100,000 in the general adolescent population 4. Chief complains from patients with OCD usually localize pain to the knee joint line, but less commonly, patients may complain of anterior knee pain. This retrospective chart review looked at the amount of OCD diagnoses in adolescents specifically complaining of anterior knee pain without causative trauma in the years 2009 and 2010 at a major children’s hospital. It was noted that 7.5% of children with this presentation had a diagnosis of OCD. This number was over three orders of magnitude higher than the incidence seen in the general adolescent population as established by Kessler and may support the use of screening radiographs in this subset of patients to detect OCD in its early stages.