Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorCompitello, Malcolm A.en
dc.contributor.authorNicolás Alba, María del Carmen
dc.creatorNicolás Alba, María del Carmenen
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-12T20:35:50Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-12T20:35:50Zen
dc.date.issued2016en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/605110en
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation begins from the premise that indigenista narrative has always been considered by critics as literature produced in the Andean region by mostly Peruvian authors, and to a lesser extent, by those from Latin American countries with a significant indigenous population. My dissertation proposes that an expanded definition of the indigenous novel to include Argentine authors offers an exciting possibility for rearticulating the nature of this important movement of Latin American narrative fiction. It analyzes five major works written during the expansion of the indigenista movement (1920-1940) by authors born in different regions of Argentina. Moreover, while it has been widely held that the first neoindigenista novels were written by the two Peruvian masters of indigenismo, Ciro Alegría and José María Arguedas in 1941, this dissertation demonstrates that El salar, published in 1936 by Argentinian author Fausto Burgo actually deserves that distinction. The analytical frame for my work draws on the groundbreaking contributions of Antonio Cornejo Polar, Tomás Escajadillo and others in recasting its vision of indigenista narrative.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectIndigenismoen
dc.subjectliteratura andinaen
dc.subjectliteratura regional argentinaen
dc.subjectPablo Rojas Pazen
dc.subjectVanguardismoen
dc.subjectSpanishen
dc.subjectFausto Burgosen
dc.titleLa Narrativa Indigenista en Argentinaen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeememberCompitello, Malcolm A.en
dc.contributor.committeememberFitch, Melissa A.en
dc.contributor.committeememberKinkade, Richard P.en
dc.contributor.committeememberMahler, Anne G.en
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSpanishen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-25T19:37:42Z
html.description.abstractThis dissertation begins from the premise that indigenista narrative has always been considered by critics as literature produced in the Andean region by mostly Peruvian authors, and to a lesser extent, by those from Latin American countries with a significant indigenous population. My dissertation proposes that an expanded definition of the indigenous novel to include Argentine authors offers an exciting possibility for rearticulating the nature of this important movement of Latin American narrative fiction. It analyzes five major works written during the expansion of the indigenista movement (1920-1940) by authors born in different regions of Argentina. Moreover, while it has been widely held that the first neoindigenista novels were written by the two Peruvian masters of indigenismo, Ciro Alegría and José María Arguedas in 1941, this dissertation demonstrates that El salar, published in 1936 by Argentinian author Fausto Burgo actually deserves that distinction. The analytical frame for my work draws on the groundbreaking contributions of Antonio Cornejo Polar, Tomás Escajadillo and others in recasting its vision of indigenista narrative.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_etd_14454_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
2.541Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record