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dc.contributor.authorHorton, Charles R.
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-14T21:27:11Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-14T21:27:11Zen
dc.date.issued1973-10en
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123en
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/605397en
dc.descriptionInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedings / October 09-11, 1973 / Sheraton Inn Northeast, Washington, D.C.en_US
dc.description.abstractNew generation satellites such as ERTS present a new challenge to the data recording industry. Continuous wideband data creates an enormous storage/retrieval problem. Recently developed high density tape storage solves the volume problem but does not provide fast access. Clearly, some cartridge type device is required. A similar problem faced the broadcast T.V. industry. Cartridge equipment was developed to allow automatic programming of short segments. This paper describes application of this technology to present and future data storage requirements. With the technique described, ERTS data can be segmented into blocks of ten frames each and stored in easily accessed tape cartridges.
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.titleUSER-ORIENTED IMAGE DATA CARTRIDGE RECORDING SYSTEMen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentRadio Corporation of Americaen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T08:52:41Z
html.description.abstractNew generation satellites such as ERTS present a new challenge to the data recording industry. Continuous wideband data creates an enormous storage/retrieval problem. Recently developed high density tape storage solves the volume problem but does not provide fast access. Clearly, some cartridge type device is required. A similar problem faced the broadcast T.V. industry. Cartridge equipment was developed to allow automatic programming of short segments. This paper describes application of this technology to present and future data storage requirements. With the technique described, ERTS data can be segmented into blocks of ten frames each and stored in easily accessed tape cartridges.


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