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dc.contributor.advisorSlaughter, Jerelen
dc.contributor.authorShah, Shruti Mukesh
dc.creatorShah, Shruti Mukeshen
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-25T20:24:51Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-25T20:24:51Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/607075en
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to establish whether a relation between confidence in judgments and decisions is affected when individuals are made aware of their birth order position. Students from The University of Arizona were recruited and asked to give upper- and lower-bound ranges for a guess before and after a subtle birth order reminder. Participants also completed The General Decision Making Style questionnaire to determine whether any style correlated with birth order position. It was discovered that no statistically significant relationship was found between reminder of birth order position and confidence in decisions made. The General Decision Making Style Questionnaire indicated a significant relationship between age and the intuitive style.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectBirth Orderen
dc.subjectPositionen
dc.subjectConfidenceen
dc.subjectIntervalsen
dc.subjectJudgmenten
dc.subjectDecision Makingen
dc.titleThe Relation Between Birth Order and Confidence in Expressed Judgmentsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-01T16:41:07Z
html.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to establish whether a relation between confidence in judgments and decisions is affected when individuals are made aware of their birth order position. Students from The University of Arizona were recruited and asked to give upper- and lower-bound ranges for a guess before and after a subtle birth order reminder. Participants also completed The General Decision Making Style questionnaire to determine whether any style correlated with birth order position. It was discovered that no statistically significant relationship was found between reminder of birth order position and confidence in decisions made. The General Decision Making Style Questionnaire indicated a significant relationship between age and the intuitive style.


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