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dc.contributor.authorSeeber, Kevin Patrick*
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-04T02:41:43Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-04T02:41:43Zen
dc.date.issued2016-02en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/607784en
dc.descriptionPresentation. Critical Librarianship & Pedagogy Symposium, February 25-26, 2016, The University of Arizona.en
dc.description.abstractAcademic instruction librarians often introduce students to the concept of evaluating information by having them compare “scholarly versus popular” sources--an approach that wrongly implies these two kinds of information are a binary, and that they are in competition with one another. This presentation will question the motivations behind presenting scholarly and popular information in this way, as well as offer recommendations for how librarians can adapt this activity into something which allows for critical discussions of context and authority in the classroom.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizonaen
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.en
dc.subjectInformation Literacyen
dc.subjectLibrary instructionen
dc.titleIt's Not a Competition: Questioning the Rhetoric of "Scholarly Versus Popular" in Library Instructionen_US
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Colorado Denveren
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the Critical Librarianship & Pedagogy Symposium are made available by the symposium creators and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact the CLAPS committee at http://claps2016.wix.com/home#!about/cjg9 if you have questions about items in this collection.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T09:52:11Z
html.description.abstractAcademic instruction librarians often introduce students to the concept of evaluating information by having them compare “scholarly versus popular” sources--an approach that wrongly implies these two kinds of information are a binary, and that they are in competition with one another. This presentation will question the motivations behind presenting scholarly and popular information in this way, as well as offer recommendations for how librarians can adapt this activity into something which allows for critical discussions of context and authority in the classroom.


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