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dc.contributor.authorBiroscak, D.
dc.contributor.authorLosik, L.
dc.contributor.authorMalina, R. F.
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-06T21:49:16Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-06T21:49:16Zen
dc.date.issued1995-11en
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123en
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/608544en
dc.descriptionInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedings / October 30-November 02, 1995 / Riviera Hotel, Las Vegas, Nevadaen_US
dc.description.abstractThe Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) Science Operations Center at UC Berkeley was recently successful in implementing an automated monitoring system that allowed reduced operations staffing from 24 hours per day to 9 hours per day. The payload safety is monitored exclusively by artificial intelligence (AI) telemetry-processing systems for 16 hours per day. At launch, the EUVE Science Operations Center was staffed and operated as a typical satellite control center, receiving real-time and tape recorder data 24 hours per day. From September 1993 through February 1995, EUVE science operations were redesigned in a phased, low-cost approach. A key factor in the implementation was to utilize existing personnel in new roles through additional training and reorganization. Through- out this period, EUVE guest observers and science data collection were unaffected by the transition in science operations. This paper describes the original and actual implementation plan, staffing phases, and cost savings for this project. We present the lessons learned in the successful transition from three-shift to one-shift operations.
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.subjectTelemetry Monitoringen
dc.subjectMission Operations Managementen
dc.subjectArtificial Intelligenceen
dc.titleRE-ENGINEERING UEVE TELEMETRY MONITORING OPERATIONS: A MANAGEMENT PERSPECTIVE AND LESSONS LEARNED FROM A SUCCESSFUL REAL-WORLD IMPLEMENTATIONen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-26T14:28:57Z
html.description.abstractThe Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) Science Operations Center at UC Berkeley was recently successful in implementing an automated monitoring system that allowed reduced operations staffing from 24 hours per day to 9 hours per day. The payload safety is monitored exclusively by artificial intelligence (AI) telemetry-processing systems for 16 hours per day. At launch, the EUVE Science Operations Center was staffed and operated as a typical satellite control center, receiving real-time and tape recorder data 24 hours per day. From September 1993 through February 1995, EUVE science operations were redesigned in a phased, low-cost approach. A key factor in the implementation was to utilize existing personnel in new roles through additional training and reorganization. Through- out this period, EUVE guest observers and science data collection were unaffected by the transition in science operations. This paper describes the original and actual implementation plan, staffing phases, and cost savings for this project. We present the lessons learned in the successful transition from three-shift to one-shift operations.


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