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dc.contributor.authorRioux, Andre
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-07T16:32:42Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-07T16:32:42Zen
dc.date.issued2016-05-06en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/608604en
dc.descriptionSustainable Built Environments Senior Capstone Projecten
dc.description.abstractThere has been a nationwide movement which has promoted urban agriculture. The locale, seasonality, and methods of cultivation, have all entered the spotlight of public consciousness. While farmer’s markets, and co-ops may sometimes have limited accessibility with respect to cost another community gardens are branch of the urban agriculture movement which are highly accessible. The surge in popularity of community gardens came with the 2008 market crash, which created many foreclosures, and accordingly vacant lots. Where vacant lots are reclaimed by citizens, they create a sense of ownership within a community, they become physical manifestations of neighborhood rally cries, elbows rub, and community connections are made. With a relatively small amount of initial input, and continued care, there are tangible outputs, and literal fruits of labor. The popularity of these gardens extends to schools, and a whole branch of pedagogy which emphasizes place based learning. The benefits to these schools is tremendous; students are offered the opportunity to be academically engaged in a space other than the traditional classroom. Community gardens show the potential to create value from little input. With the benefit of a structured design process, there is potential to make school gardens learning space, in addition to growing space. The intent of this study is to explore the value created for these spaces by a formalized design process.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectschool gardensen
dc.subjectdesign applicationen
dc.subjectSustainabilityen
dc.subjectSustainable Designen
dc.titleAmphitheater High School’s Outdoor Classroom: A Study in the Application of Designen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.nameSustainable Built Environmentsen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Sustainable Built Environments collection. For more information, contact http://sbe.arizona.edu.en
dc.contributor.mentorLivingston, Margaret Phden
dc.contributor.instructorIuliano, Joeyen
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-12T03:29:55Z
html.description.abstractThere has been a nationwide movement which has promoted urban agriculture. The locale, seasonality, and methods of cultivation, have all entered the spotlight of public consciousness. While farmer’s markets, and co-ops may sometimes have limited accessibility with respect to cost another community gardens are branch of the urban agriculture movement which are highly accessible. The surge in popularity of community gardens came with the 2008 market crash, which created many foreclosures, and accordingly vacant lots. Where vacant lots are reclaimed by citizens, they create a sense of ownership within a community, they become physical manifestations of neighborhood rally cries, elbows rub, and community connections are made. With a relatively small amount of initial input, and continued care, there are tangible outputs, and literal fruits of labor. The popularity of these gardens extends to schools, and a whole branch of pedagogy which emphasizes place based learning. The benefits to these schools is tremendous; students are offered the opportunity to be academically engaged in a space other than the traditional classroom. Community gardens show the potential to create value from little input. With the benefit of a structured design process, there is potential to make school gardens learning space, in addition to growing space. The intent of this study is to explore the value created for these spaces by a formalized design process.


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