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dc.contributor.authorDay, A. D.
dc.contributor.authorThompson, R. K.
dc.contributor.authorSwingle, R. S.
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-11T21:21:00Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-11T21:21:00Zen
dc.date.issued1986en
dc.identifier.issn0734-3434en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/609086en
dc.description.abstractFrom 1976 through 1977, experiments were conducted at Mesa, Arizona to compare the growth and forage production from 16 barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) genotypes when grown with dried sewage sludge and inorganic fertilizers from commercial sources. In December of each year, at planting time, three fertilizer treatments were applied: (1) recommended rates of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) for barley in Arizona (160 kg /ha N from urea, 81 kg /ha P from treble super-phosphate, and no K was recommended), (2) 10 metric t/ha of sewage sludge from the Phoenix, Arizona Sewage Treatment Plant consisting of 16 kg /t N, 31 kg /t P₂O₅, and 3.6 kg /t K₂O, and (3) inorganic fertilizers to provide N, P, and K in amounts equal to those applied in the sewage sludge (160 kg /ha N from urea, 310 kg /ha P₂O₅ from treble super -phosphate, and 36 kg /ha K₂O from potassium sulfate). Barley genotypes evaluated for vegetative growth and forage production responded similarly, when fertilized with dried sewage sludge and inorganic fertilizers from commercial sources. Fertilizer -genotype interactions did not follow a uniform pattern. Significant differences were observed between genotypes, within fertilizer treatments, for number of days from planting to flowering, plant height, lodging, number of stems per unit area, and hay yield. Dried sewage sludge may be used as a fertilizer source in the commercial production of forage from barley in the same manner that commercial fertilizers are used. To investigate the maximum fertilizer response potential of specific barely genotypes for the efficient use of sewage sludge in commercial barley forage production, additional research involving barley breeding and the use of additional rates of sludge application are necessary.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.sourceCALS Publications Archive. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.titleEffects of Dried Sewage Sludge on Forage Production from Barley Genotypes in the Sonoran Deserten_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalDesert Plantsen
dc.description.collectioninformationDesert Plants is published by The University of Arizona for the Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum. For more information about this unique botanical journal, please email the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Publications Office at pubs@cals.arizona.edu.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-13T17:55:59Z
html.description.abstractFrom 1976 through 1977, experiments were conducted at Mesa, Arizona to compare the growth and forage production from 16 barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) genotypes when grown with dried sewage sludge and inorganic fertilizers from commercial sources. In December of each year, at planting time, three fertilizer treatments were applied: (1) recommended rates of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) for barley in Arizona (160 kg /ha N from urea, 81 kg /ha P from treble super-phosphate, and no K was recommended), (2) 10 metric t/ha of sewage sludge from the Phoenix, Arizona Sewage Treatment Plant consisting of 16 kg /t N, 31 kg /t P₂O₅, and 3.6 kg /t K₂O, and (3) inorganic fertilizers to provide N, P, and K in amounts equal to those applied in the sewage sludge (160 kg /ha N from urea, 310 kg /ha P₂O₅ from treble super -phosphate, and 36 kg /ha K₂O from potassium sulfate). Barley genotypes evaluated for vegetative growth and forage production responded similarly, when fertilized with dried sewage sludge and inorganic fertilizers from commercial sources. Fertilizer -genotype interactions did not follow a uniform pattern. Significant differences were observed between genotypes, within fertilizer treatments, for number of days from planting to flowering, plant height, lodging, number of stems per unit area, and hay yield. Dried sewage sludge may be used as a fertilizer source in the commercial production of forage from barley in the same manner that commercial fertilizers are used. To investigate the maximum fertilizer response potential of specific barely genotypes for the efficient use of sewage sludge in commercial barley forage production, additional research involving barley breeding and the use of additional rates of sludge application are necessary.


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