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dc.contributor.authorStroozas, B. A.
dc.contributor.authorBiroscak, D.
dc.contributor.authorEckert, M.
dc.contributor.authorGirouard, F.
dc.contributor.authorHopkins, A.
dc.contributor.authorKaplan, G. C.
dc.contributor.authorKronberg, F.
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, K. E.
dc.contributor.authorRingrose, P.
dc.contributor.authorSmith, C. L.
dc.contributor.authorVallerga, J. V.
dc.contributor.authorWong, L. S.
dc.contributor.authorMalina, R. F.
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-01T17:39:53Z
dc.date.available2016-06-01T17:39:53Z
dc.date.issued1996-10
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/611421
dc.descriptionInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedings / October 28-31, 1996 / Town and Country Hotel and Convention Center, San Diego, Californiaen_US
dc.description.abstractThe science payload for NASA's Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite is controlled from the EUVE Science Operations Center (ESOC) at the Center for EUV Astrophysics (CEA), University of California, Berkeley (UCB). The ESOC is in the process of a transition from a single staffed shift to an autonomous, zero-shift, "lights out" science payload operations scenario (a.k.a., 1:0). The purpose of the 1:0 transition is to automate all of the remaining routine, daily, controller telemetry monitoring and associated "shift" work. Building on the ESOC's recent success moving from three-shift to one-shift operations (completed in Feb 1995), the 1:0 transition will further reduce payload operations costs and will be a "proof of concept" for future missions; it is also in line with NASA's goals of "cheaper, faster, better" operations and with its desire to out-source missions like EUVE to academe and industry. This paper describes the 1:0 transition for the EUVE science payload: the purpose, goals, and benefits; the relevant science payload instrument health and safety considerations; the requirements for, and implementation of, the multi-phased approach; a cost/benefit analysis; and the various lessons learned along the way.
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.subjectExtreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satelliteen
dc.subjectartificial intelligence (AI)en
dc.subjecttelemetry monitoringen
dc.subjectautonomous operationsen
dc.subjectsatellite operationsen
dc.subjectzero-shift operationsen
dc.titleThe NASA EUVE Satellite in Transition: From Staffed to Autonomous Science Payload Operationsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of California, Berkeleyen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-24T16:55:25Z
html.description.abstractThe science payload for NASA's Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite is controlled from the EUVE Science Operations Center (ESOC) at the Center for EUV Astrophysics (CEA), University of California, Berkeley (UCB). The ESOC is in the process of a transition from a single staffed shift to an autonomous, zero-shift, "lights out" science payload operations scenario (a.k.a., 1:0). The purpose of the 1:0 transition is to automate all of the remaining routine, daily, controller telemetry monitoring and associated "shift" work. Building on the ESOC's recent success moving from three-shift to one-shift operations (completed in Feb 1995), the 1:0 transition will further reduce payload operations costs and will be a "proof of concept" for future missions; it is also in line with NASA's goals of "cheaper, faster, better" operations and with its desire to out-source missions like EUVE to academe and industry. This paper describes the 1:0 transition for the EUVE science payload: the purpose, goals, and benefits; the relevant science payload instrument health and safety considerations; the requirements for, and implementation of, the multi-phased approach; a cost/benefit analysis; and the various lessons learned along the way.


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