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dc.contributor.advisorFletcher, Todden
dc.contributor.authorChambers, Alex Wayne
dc.creatorChambers, Alex Wayneen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-10T18:13:02Z
dc.date.available2016-06-10T18:13:02Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/612556
dc.description.abstractWhile the number of students with learning disabilities entering the postsecondary environment is rising, many of these students have not yet acquired the skills to help them request necessary academic accommodations. Students with learning disabilities need to recognize how their disability affects their academic learning, and need to have the strategies and skills known as self-advocacy, so that they can request and obtain these accommodations. Unfortunately, many of these students, particularly Latino students, have not been given the opportunity to acquire advocacy skills prior to entering the postsecondary education setting. Trainor (2005) identified that Latino male students' plans for life after high school were not reflected in their individual transition plans. While the number of Latino males graduating with college degrees is declining (Sáenz & Ponjuan, 2009), Hurtado, Sáenz, Santos, and Cabrera (2008) have identified an upward trend among Latino males' self-rated academic abilities and desire to achieve. Due to Latino males avoidance of help-seeking behaviors, even when they are aware of academic resources that are available (Cabrera, Rashwan-Soto, & Valencia, 2016), they are a population that would benefit from instruction in these skills. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a self-advocacy intervention on Latino male college students' abilities to request academic accommodations. Findings demonstrated a functional relationship between the self-advocacy intervention and students' abilities to request academic accommodations in a role-play situation. In addition, all students were able to fully generalize the target behaviors to the real life setting as well. Last, data obtained from social validity surveys revealed the significance of the effects of the intervention on the dependent variables.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectcommunicationen
dc.subjectlearning disabilityen
dc.subjectself-advocacyen
dc.subjectself-efficacyen
dc.subjectsingle-subjecten
dc.subjectSpecial Educationen
dc.subjectaccommodationsen
dc.titleEffects of a Self-Advocacy Intervention on Latino Male College Students' Ability to Request Academic Accommodationsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeememberJones, Allisonen
dc.contributor.committeememberWilkinson-Lee, Adaen
dc.contributor.committeememberMather, Nancyen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Educationen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T12:27:14Z
html.description.abstractWhile the number of students with learning disabilities entering the postsecondary environment is rising, many of these students have not yet acquired the skills to help them request necessary academic accommodations. Students with learning disabilities need to recognize how their disability affects their academic learning, and need to have the strategies and skills known as self-advocacy, so that they can request and obtain these accommodations. Unfortunately, many of these students, particularly Latino students, have not been given the opportunity to acquire advocacy skills prior to entering the postsecondary education setting. Trainor (2005) identified that Latino male students' plans for life after high school were not reflected in their individual transition plans. While the number of Latino males graduating with college degrees is declining (Sáenz & Ponjuan, 2009), Hurtado, Sáenz, Santos, and Cabrera (2008) have identified an upward trend among Latino males' self-rated academic abilities and desire to achieve. Due to Latino males avoidance of help-seeking behaviors, even when they are aware of academic resources that are available (Cabrera, Rashwan-Soto, & Valencia, 2016), they are a population that would benefit from instruction in these skills. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a self-advocacy intervention on Latino male college students' abilities to request academic accommodations. Findings demonstrated a functional relationship between the self-advocacy intervention and students' abilities to request academic accommodations in a role-play situation. In addition, all students were able to fully generalize the target behaviors to the real life setting as well. Last, data obtained from social validity surveys revealed the significance of the effects of the intervention on the dependent variables.


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