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dc.contributor.advisorBeck, Connie J.A.en
dc.contributor.authorKAPLAN, TAMAR FRANCES
dc.creatorKAPLAN, TAMAR FRANCESen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-14T19:30:01Z
dc.date.available2016-06-14T19:30:01Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/613113
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: This study examined the differences between young adults from divorced households (N=54) and young adults from always-married households (N=120) in terms of romantic relationship dissolution patterns, perceptions of inter-parental conflict, child-parent bonding, and attitudes toward divorce. It was hypothesized that young adults from divorced households would have a greater number of romantic relationships and would report a lack of investment and conflict as reasons for relationship dissolutions more frequently than young adults from always-married households. It was also hypothesized that young adults who report high inter-parental conflict would hold more positive attitudes toward divorce and that young adults with reported high parental bonding would have less positive attitudes toward divorce. Methods: Data was collected via an online survey. Results: Findings revealed that young adults from divorced households had significantly fewer romantic relationships than young adults from always-married households. Supporting hypotheses, young adults from divorced households reported a lack of investment as a reason for romantic relationship dissolution more often than did young adults from always-married households. All other predictions were not supported. Discussion: Such findings indicate that there may not be a clear line between attitudes toward divorce and child-parent bonding and perceptions of inter-parental conflict.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.titleROMANTIC RELATIONSHIP PATTERNS IN YOUNG ADULTS FROM DIVORCED VERSUS ALWAYS-MARRIED FAMILIESen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T12:55:36Z
html.description.abstractIntroduction: This study examined the differences between young adults from divorced households (N=54) and young adults from always-married households (N=120) in terms of romantic relationship dissolution patterns, perceptions of inter-parental conflict, child-parent bonding, and attitudes toward divorce. It was hypothesized that young adults from divorced households would have a greater number of romantic relationships and would report a lack of investment and conflict as reasons for relationship dissolutions more frequently than young adults from always-married households. It was also hypothesized that young adults who report high inter-parental conflict would hold more positive attitudes toward divorce and that young adults with reported high parental bonding would have less positive attitudes toward divorce. Methods: Data was collected via an online survey. Results: Findings revealed that young adults from divorced households had significantly fewer romantic relationships than young adults from always-married households. Supporting hypotheses, young adults from divorced households reported a lack of investment as a reason for romantic relationship dissolution more often than did young adults from always-married households. All other predictions were not supported. Discussion: Such findings indicate that there may not be a clear line between attitudes toward divorce and child-parent bonding and perceptions of inter-parental conflict.


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