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dc.contributor.authorSolomon, Otis M., Jr.
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-15T16:37:10Z
dc.date.available2016-06-15T16:37:10Z
dc.date.issued1982-09
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/613239
dc.descriptionInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedings / September 28-30, 1982 / Sheraton Harbor Island Hotel and Convention Center, San Diego, Californiaen_US
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, the problem of non-constant tape speed is examined for frequency modulated signals. Frequency modulation and demodulation are briefly reviewed. Tape speed variation is modeled as a distortion of the independent variable of a frequency modulated signal. This distortion produces an additive amplitude error in the demodulated message which is comprised of two terms. Both depend on the derivative of time base error, which is the flutter of the analog tape machine. The first term depends on the channel’s center frequency and frequency deviation constant as well as flutter, while the second depends solely on the message and flutter. The relationship between the additive amplitude error and manufacturer’s flutter specification is described. Relative errors and signal-to-noise ratios are discussed for the case of a constant message to gain insight as to when tape speed variation will cause significant errors. An algorithm which theoretically achieves full compensation of tape speed variation is developed. The algorithm is confirmed via spectral computations on laboratory data. Finally, the algorithm is applied to field data. The reference is a temperature signal which is a non-zero constant, and the message is a pressure signal. The spectrum of the uncompensated message is clearly contaminated by the additive amplitude error, whereas the spectrum of the compensated message is not. Incorporation of this algorithm into the data-playback/data-reduction procedures is shown to greatly improve the measurement signal accuracy and quality. The treatment is nonmystical in that all derivations are directly tied to the fundamental equations describing frequency modulation and demodulation.
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.titleA NONMYSTICAL TREATMENT OF TAPE SPEED COMPENSATION FOR FREQUENCY MODULATED SIGNALSen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentSandia National Laboratoriesen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-26T15:52:20Z
html.description.abstractIn this paper, the problem of non-constant tape speed is examined for frequency modulated signals. Frequency modulation and demodulation are briefly reviewed. Tape speed variation is modeled as a distortion of the independent variable of a frequency modulated signal. This distortion produces an additive amplitude error in the demodulated message which is comprised of two terms. Both depend on the derivative of time base error, which is the flutter of the analog tape machine. The first term depends on the channel’s center frequency and frequency deviation constant as well as flutter, while the second depends solely on the message and flutter. The relationship between the additive amplitude error and manufacturer’s flutter specification is described. Relative errors and signal-to-noise ratios are discussed for the case of a constant message to gain insight as to when tape speed variation will cause significant errors. An algorithm which theoretically achieves full compensation of tape speed variation is developed. The algorithm is confirmed via spectral computations on laboratory data. Finally, the algorithm is applied to field data. The reference is a temperature signal which is a non-zero constant, and the message is a pressure signal. The spectrum of the uncompensated message is clearly contaminated by the additive amplitude error, whereas the spectrum of the compensated message is not. Incorporation of this algorithm into the data-playback/data-reduction procedures is shown to greatly improve the measurement signal accuracy and quality. The treatment is nonmystical in that all derivations are directly tied to the fundamental equations describing frequency modulation and demodulation.


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