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dc.contributor.advisorMatsunaga, Terry O.en
dc.contributor.authorHadinger, Kyle
dc.creatorHadinger, Kyleen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-16T17:38:26Z
dc.date.available2016-06-16T17:38:26Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/613381
dc.description.abstractPhase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) are an innovative form of imaging agent with practical applications in both the research and clinical settings. PCCAs are derived from gaseous microbubbles, which are able to act as targeted-contrast agents through conjugation of a ligand that is selective for an overexpressed receptor or biomarker in a given disease. Gaseous microbubbles can be condensed to liquid phase nanodroplets, which should be sufficiently small to extravasate into cells and/or tissues given their size and stability. Once liquid nanodroplets have internalized within a given tissue, they can be "activated" back into gaseous microbubbles with ultrasound at clinically used frequencies and energy outputs. This is purposeful as microbubbles provide much greater ultrasound reflectivity than nanodroplets. In this study, PCCAs and/or microbubbles act as a targeting agent in multiple scenarios. The projects in this study include- examination of binding and internalization of targeted PCCAs with different gaseous cores within MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, vaporization of liquid phase nanodroplets through application of acoustic energy via focused ultrasound (FUS), and targeting vulnerable plaque in the heart with different types of targeted microbubbles under varying shear-stresses.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectConfocal Microscopyen
dc.subjectMicrobubblesen
dc.subjectPhase-Change Contrast Agentsen
dc.subjectUltrasounden
dc.subjectVulnerable Plaqueen
dc.subjectBiomedical Engineeringen
dc.subjectBreast Canceren
dc.titlePhase-Change Contrast Agents for Targeting and Deliveryen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
dc.contributor.committeememberTrouard, Theodoreen
dc.contributor.committeememberVagner, Josefen
dc.contributor.committeememberWitte, Russellen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineBiomedical Engineeringen
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-27T06:14:52Z
html.description.abstractPhase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) are an innovative form of imaging agent with practical applications in both the research and clinical settings. PCCAs are derived from gaseous microbubbles, which are able to act as targeted-contrast agents through conjugation of a ligand that is selective for an overexpressed receptor or biomarker in a given disease. Gaseous microbubbles can be condensed to liquid phase nanodroplets, which should be sufficiently small to extravasate into cells and/or tissues given their size and stability. Once liquid nanodroplets have internalized within a given tissue, they can be "activated" back into gaseous microbubbles with ultrasound at clinically used frequencies and energy outputs. This is purposeful as microbubbles provide much greater ultrasound reflectivity than nanodroplets. In this study, PCCAs and/or microbubbles act as a targeting agent in multiple scenarios. The projects in this study include- examination of binding and internalization of targeted PCCAs with different gaseous cores within MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, vaporization of liquid phase nanodroplets through application of acoustic energy via focused ultrasound (FUS), and targeting vulnerable plaque in the heart with different types of targeted microbubbles under varying shear-stresses.


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