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dc.contributor.advisorRussell, S.T.en
dc.contributor.authorChay, Or Avraham
dc.contributor.authorFish, J.
dc.contributor.authorRussell, S.T.
dc.creatorChay, Or Avrahamen
dc.creatorFish, J.en
dc.creatorRussell, S.T.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-20T23:17:29Z
dc.date.available2016-06-20T23:17:29Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/613813
dc.description.abstractThe current study uses Meyer’s (1995) minority stress theory as a framework in an attempt to discover variables that play a role in the relationship between sexual minorities and substance use. The literature is latent with evidence suggesting that sexual minorities are more prone to engage in substance use as compared with their heterosexual peers. In a meta-analysis conducted by Marshal and colleagues (2008) about the mentioned relationship, a gap was signaled regarding possible variables that play a role. This study used data from a three-year longitudinal study assessing risk and protective factors for suicide among sexual and gender minority youth (ages 15-21) in three major cities in the northeast, southwest, and west coast of the United States in an attempt to discover the mentioned variables. The study found insightful significant associations between various variables and the relationship between LGB individuals and substance use. Particularly, demonstrating the importance of prenatal support in protecting LGB individuals against substance use frequency and substance use related problems.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.titleThe Relationship Between LGB individuals and Substance Useen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-04T13:46:05Z
html.description.abstractThe current study uses Meyer’s (1995) minority stress theory as a framework in an attempt to discover variables that play a role in the relationship between sexual minorities and substance use. The literature is latent with evidence suggesting that sexual minorities are more prone to engage in substance use as compared with their heterosexual peers. In a meta-analysis conducted by Marshal and colleagues (2008) about the mentioned relationship, a gap was signaled regarding possible variables that play a role. This study used data from a three-year longitudinal study assessing risk and protective factors for suicide among sexual and gender minority youth (ages 15-21) in three major cities in the northeast, southwest, and west coast of the United States in an attempt to discover the mentioned variables. The study found insightful significant associations between various variables and the relationship between LGB individuals and substance use. Particularly, demonstrating the importance of prenatal support in protecting LGB individuals against substance use frequency and substance use related problems.


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