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dc.contributor.advisorGoldstone, Lisaen
dc.contributor.advisorHall-Lipsy, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorKaiser, Monica
dc.contributor.authorGoldstone, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorHall-Lipsy, Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T16:07:52Z
dc.date.available2016-06-22T16:07:52Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614104
dc.descriptionClass of 2015 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Characterize all patients in the emergency room diagnosed with anxiety disorders from 11/01/2013 until 5/31/2014 to identify insurance coverage and demographic trends. Methods: Retrospective descriptive study of patients who present to the emergency department between 11/01/2013 – 05/31/2014 and discharged with a primary documented diagnosis of an anxiety disorder. Age, race, and gender were recorded in addition to insurance coverage. Results: 406 visits were reviewed: 212 (52.2%) males and 194 (47.8%) females. Average age per visit: 40.34 (SD=13.388). Race recorded with each visit: 189 (46.6%) white, 146 (36.0%) Hispanic, 42 (10.3%) African American, and 29 (2.2%) other. The most common insurance coverage was Medicaid at 63.3%, while 6.4% of visits had no insurance coverage. There was a significant difference in the distribution in number of ED visits between genders (Mann-Whitney U=17,407.5, p=0.007, sig ≥0.05). A Kruskal-Wallis Test showed a significant difference in the number of ED visits between racial groups X²=43.434, p=0.000 as well as a significant difference between Medicaid and other insurance groups X²=37.778, p=0.021. Conclusions: Men appear to have a higher frequency in anxiety symptoms requiring an ED visit than women do. White patients tend to have a greater frequency in anxiety symptoms followed by Hispanic patients. Medicaid tends to be the most prevalent insurance coverage used.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectAffordable Care Acten
dc.subjectMedicaid Expansion Programen
dc.subjectAnxiety Disordersen
dc.subjectEmergency Room Visitsen
dc.subject.meshPatient Protection and Affordable Care Act
dc.subject.meshMedicaid
dc.subject.meshAnxiety Disorders
dc.subject.meshEmergency Service, Hospital
dc.titleThe Impact of the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid Expansion Program on Emergency Room Visits for Patients with Anxiety Disordersen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
html.description.abstractObjectives: Characterize all patients in the emergency room diagnosed with anxiety disorders from 11/01/2013 until 5/31/2014 to identify insurance coverage and demographic trends. Methods: Retrospective descriptive study of patients who present to the emergency department between 11/01/2013 – 05/31/2014 and discharged with a primary documented diagnosis of an anxiety disorder. Age, race, and gender were recorded in addition to insurance coverage. Results: 406 visits were reviewed: 212 (52.2%) males and 194 (47.8%) females. Average age per visit: 40.34 (SD=13.388). Race recorded with each visit: 189 (46.6%) white, 146 (36.0%) Hispanic, 42 (10.3%) African American, and 29 (2.2%) other. The most common insurance coverage was Medicaid at 63.3%, while 6.4% of visits had no insurance coverage. There was a significant difference in the distribution in number of ED visits between genders (Mann-Whitney U=17,407.5, p=0.007, sig ≥0.05). A Kruskal-Wallis Test showed a significant difference in the number of ED visits between racial groups X²=43.434, p=0.000 as well as a significant difference between Medicaid and other insurance groups X²=37.778, p=0.021. Conclusions: Men appear to have a higher frequency in anxiety symptoms requiring an ED visit than women do. White patients tend to have a greater frequency in anxiety symptoms followed by Hispanic patients. Medicaid tends to be the most prevalent insurance coverage used.


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