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dc.contributor.advisorBrody, Jacquelineen
dc.contributor.authorEdmonds, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorBrody, Jacqueline
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T16:20:13Z
dc.date.available2016-06-22T16:20:13Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614107
dc.descriptionClass of 2015 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The purpose of the study was to analyze the effect of a network wide computer system and the implementation of weight based dosing on heparin alert rates. Our central hypotheses was that the implementation of a network wide computer system will decrease alert rates for heparin infusions on smart pump infusion systems. Our rationale for this study was to evaluate methods to improve patient safety for high alert medications such as heparin. Methods: This was a before-after study design evaluating the effect of the intervention using data obtained by a smart pump infusion system. Heparin infusions at the university campus were analyzed for the effect of a network wide computer system, administered in the adult ICU or Med/Surg unit between July 2013-September 2013 and from January 2014-March 2014. Pump data from before the implementation of the network wide computer system was compared to the pump data obtained after the network wide computer system. Results: After the implementation of a hospital wide computerized physician order entry system, there was a statistically significant increase in heparin alert rates from 15.7 alerts per 100 infusions of heparin to an alert rate of 20.2 alerts per 100 infusions of heparin (P=0.001). Conclusions: The implementation of a network wide computerized physician order entry was associated with an increase in alert generation rate on smart pump infusion systems. Further studies are needed to elucidate this unexpected increase in alerts.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectSystemen
dc.subjectDosingen
dc.subjectHeparinen
dc.subject.meshHeparin
dc.subject.meshDrug Dosage Calculations
dc.subject.meshComputer Systems
dc.titleEffect of a Network Wide Computer Entry System and Weight Based Dosing on Heparin Alert Ratesen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
html.description.abstractObjectives: The purpose of the study was to analyze the effect of a network wide computer system and the implementation of weight based dosing on heparin alert rates. Our central hypotheses was that the implementation of a network wide computer system will decrease alert rates for heparin infusions on smart pump infusion systems. Our rationale for this study was to evaluate methods to improve patient safety for high alert medications such as heparin. Methods: This was a before-after study design evaluating the effect of the intervention using data obtained by a smart pump infusion system. Heparin infusions at the university campus were analyzed for the effect of a network wide computer system, administered in the adult ICU or Med/Surg unit between July 2013-September 2013 and from January 2014-March 2014. Pump data from before the implementation of the network wide computer system was compared to the pump data obtained after the network wide computer system. Results: After the implementation of a hospital wide computerized physician order entry system, there was a statistically significant increase in heparin alert rates from 15.7 alerts per 100 infusions of heparin to an alert rate of 20.2 alerts per 100 infusions of heparin (P=0.001). Conclusions: The implementation of a network wide computerized physician order entry was associated with an increase in alert generation rate on smart pump infusion systems. Further studies are needed to elucidate this unexpected increase in alerts.


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