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dc.contributor.advisorLee, Jeannieen
dc.contributor.authorAsllani, Valmira
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, An
dc.contributor.authorPhung, Lena
dc.contributor.authorLee, Jeannie
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T19:11:21Z
dc.date.available2016-06-22T19:11:21Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614202
dc.descriptionClass of 2014 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: To create and implement an educational presentation on polypharmacy using interactive strategies. Secondly, to assess the effectiveness of the interventional presentation by evaluating its helpfulness in improving polypharmacy awareness among older adults as measured by a retrospective pre-post participant survey. Methods: Residents of select independent senior living facilities in Tucson, Arizona were invited to attend an interactive, educational program entitled "What is Polypharmacy?" presented by fourth-year Doctor of Pharmacy students. This program consisted of a 30-minute PowerPoint presentation, which included various interactive learning approaches, followed by a 10-minute question and answer period. An anonymous retrospective pre-post survey was distributed to the participants after the presentation to evaluate the effectiveness and helpfulness of the program, as determined by the participants’ ratings on Likert-type scales and willingness to confidently engage in medication self-management. Main Results: Of the 73 participants from the six independent living facilities, 55 surveys were collected from the residents and 54 surveys were included in the data analysis. The retrospective pre-post data analysis found that familiarity with the definition of polypharmacy increased (p<0.001), understanding of the risks of polypharmacy increased (p<0.001), and the willingness to manage one’s own medications increased (p=0.045). Overall, 95.9% of the participants found this educational program to be helpful, and 95.8% of the participants would recommend this program to a friend. Conclusion: The interactive, educational program about polypharmacy, created and presented by pharmacy students, was helpful and effective in increasing polypharmacy awareness among older adults residing in independent senior living facilities.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectInteractiveen
dc.subjectAdultsen
dc.subjectPolypharmacyen
dc.subjectEducateen
dc.subject.meshPolypharmacy
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshEducation
dc.subject.meshStudents, Pharmacy
dc.titleAn Interactive Approach to Educate Older Adults about Polypharmacyen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
html.description.abstractSpecific Aims: To create and implement an educational presentation on polypharmacy using interactive strategies. Secondly, to assess the effectiveness of the interventional presentation by evaluating its helpfulness in improving polypharmacy awareness among older adults as measured by a retrospective pre-post participant survey. Methods: Residents of select independent senior living facilities in Tucson, Arizona were invited to attend an interactive, educational program entitled "What is Polypharmacy?" presented by fourth-year Doctor of Pharmacy students. This program consisted of a 30-minute PowerPoint presentation, which included various interactive learning approaches, followed by a 10-minute question and answer period. An anonymous retrospective pre-post survey was distributed to the participants after the presentation to evaluate the effectiveness and helpfulness of the program, as determined by the participants’ ratings on Likert-type scales and willingness to confidently engage in medication self-management. Main Results: Of the 73 participants from the six independent living facilities, 55 surveys were collected from the residents and 54 surveys were included in the data analysis. The retrospective pre-post data analysis found that familiarity with the definition of polypharmacy increased (p<0.001), understanding of the risks of polypharmacy increased (p<0.001), and the willingness to manage one’s own medications increased (p=0.045). Overall, 95.9% of the participants found this educational program to be helpful, and 95.8% of the participants would recommend this program to a friend. Conclusion: The interactive, educational program about polypharmacy, created and presented by pharmacy students, was helpful and effective in increasing polypharmacy awareness among older adults residing in independent senior living facilities.


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