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dc.contributor.advisorSkrepnek, Granten
dc.contributor.authorDong, Alex
dc.contributor.authorSkrepnek, Grant
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T21:26:01Z
dc.date.available2016-06-22T21:26:01Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614256
dc.descriptionClass of 2013 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: To assess associations between clinical and economic outcomes of metastatic thyroid cancer within inpatient settings in the United States from 2001-2010. To determine the direct inpatient burden of and describe the characteristics of patients and hospitals associated with metastatic thyroid cancer. Methods: A multivariate retrospective cohort study was performed on the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project-Nationwide Inpatient Sample database, for the years 2001-2010, focusing on three main outcomes: inpatient mortality, inpatient charges, and inpatient length of stay. Regression analyses controlled for patient demographics, hospital characteristics, payer, clinical comorbidities, and site of metastases. Inclusion criteria included: age ≥ 18 years, any listed diagnosis of thyroid cancer, and any listed secondary malignancy. Main Results: Overall, 84,191 inpatient cases were observed for metastatic thyroid cancer with 3,032 resulting in mortality (3.6%). The total charges were $3.1 billion (USD 2012) for overall inpatient hospitalizations with average inpatient charges at $38,292 (SD±56,135) for each overall case and $80,948 (SD±117,645) for each mortality-only case. Higher inpatient mortality, charges, and length of stay were significantly associated with central nervous system and lung metastatic cancer sites (p < 0.01) and deficiency anemias, coagulopathy, fluid and electrolyte disorders, pulmonary circulation disorders, and weight loss comorbidities (p < 0.01). Conclusion: There is a considerable national inpatient burden of metastatic thyroid cancer. The analyses in this study quantify the associations and outcomes, and as such can be used to assist in the prediction of those outcomes and clinical decision-making.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectImpacten
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subjectUnited States Healthcare Systemen
dc.subject.meshThyroid Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome
dc.subject.meshInpatients
dc.titleImpact of Inpatient Metastatic Thyroid Cancer on the United States Healthcare Systemen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
html.description.abstractSpecific Aims: To assess associations between clinical and economic outcomes of metastatic thyroid cancer within inpatient settings in the United States from 2001-2010. To determine the direct inpatient burden of and describe the characteristics of patients and hospitals associated with metastatic thyroid cancer. Methods: A multivariate retrospective cohort study was performed on the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project-Nationwide Inpatient Sample database, for the years 2001-2010, focusing on three main outcomes: inpatient mortality, inpatient charges, and inpatient length of stay. Regression analyses controlled for patient demographics, hospital characteristics, payer, clinical comorbidities, and site of metastases. Inclusion criteria included: age ≥ 18 years, any listed diagnosis of thyroid cancer, and any listed secondary malignancy. Main Results: Overall, 84,191 inpatient cases were observed for metastatic thyroid cancer with 3,032 resulting in mortality (3.6%). The total charges were $3.1 billion (USD 2012) for overall inpatient hospitalizations with average inpatient charges at $38,292 (SD±56,135) for each overall case and $80,948 (SD±117,645) for each mortality-only case. Higher inpatient mortality, charges, and length of stay were significantly associated with central nervous system and lung metastatic cancer sites (p < 0.01) and deficiency anemias, coagulopathy, fluid and electrolyte disorders, pulmonary circulation disorders, and weight loss comorbidities (p < 0.01). Conclusion: There is a considerable national inpatient burden of metastatic thyroid cancer. The analyses in this study quantify the associations and outcomes, and as such can be used to assist in the prediction of those outcomes and clinical decision-making.


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