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dc.contributor.advisorLee, Jeannieen
dc.contributor.advisorBrownstein, Sandraen
dc.contributor.authorMoroz, Marina
dc.contributor.authorLee, Jeannie
dc.contributor.authorBrownstein, Sandra
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T22:23:50Z
dc.date.available2016-06-22T22:23:50Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614269
dc.descriptionClass of 2013 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: The purpose of the project was to determine if implementation of a detailed pharmacist recommendation form written for providers, could be an effective tool to reduce the use of antipsychotics in the psychiatric nursing home patients with dementia by 15%. Methods: The project was conducted by a pharmacy student and a consultant pharmacist at a single psychiatric nursing home. Thirty recommendations were written to the nursing home providers. The prescribers made comments on the forms and returned them to investigators for analysis. Active orders were compared pre and post pharmacy recommendations. Main Results: Of the 30 interventions, the prescriber addressed 26 (87%) recommendations and agreed to 15 (58%) of them. Nine recommendations involved either a GDR, discontinuation of a medication, or switching to a non-pharmacological method. Six of the nine (66%) recommendations led to the prescriber reducing the dose or discontinuing the medication. Overall, six out of 30 (20%) interventions resulted in a successful reduction of the use of antipsychotics. Conclusion: This project showed that when the prescribers see a more detailed pharmacist written recommendation regarding the therapy, they are more likely to respond with an explanation. However, even though the overall reduction was 20%, black box warnings did not seem to be a deterrent for prescribing in this psychiatric nursing home. Antipsychotics are heavily relied on to control behaviors associated with dementia.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectReductionen
dc.subjectAntipsychoticen
dc.subjectDementiaen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subject.meshNursing Homes
dc.subject.meshAntipsychotic Agents
dc.subject.meshDementia
dc.subject.meshPharmacists
dc.titleQuality Improvement Project: Reduction of Antipsychotic Use in Nursing Home Patients with Dementiaen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
html.description.abstractSpecific Aims: The purpose of the project was to determine if implementation of a detailed pharmacist recommendation form written for providers, could be an effective tool to reduce the use of antipsychotics in the psychiatric nursing home patients with dementia by 15%. Methods: The project was conducted by a pharmacy student and a consultant pharmacist at a single psychiatric nursing home. Thirty recommendations were written to the nursing home providers. The prescribers made comments on the forms and returned them to investigators for analysis. Active orders were compared pre and post pharmacy recommendations. Main Results: Of the 30 interventions, the prescriber addressed 26 (87%) recommendations and agreed to 15 (58%) of them. Nine recommendations involved either a GDR, discontinuation of a medication, or switching to a non-pharmacological method. Six of the nine (66%) recommendations led to the prescriber reducing the dose or discontinuing the medication. Overall, six out of 30 (20%) interventions resulted in a successful reduction of the use of antipsychotics. Conclusion: This project showed that when the prescribers see a more detailed pharmacist written recommendation regarding the therapy, they are more likely to respond with an explanation. However, even though the overall reduction was 20%, black box warnings did not seem to be a deterrent for prescribing in this psychiatric nursing home. Antipsychotics are heavily relied on to control behaviors associated with dementia.


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