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dc.contributor.advisorVaillancourt, Richarden
dc.contributor.advisorFregosi, Ralphen
dc.contributor.authorRichard, Levine
dc.contributor.authorVaillancourt, Richard
dc.contributor.authorFregosi, Ralph
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-23T19:56:01Z
dc.date.available2016-06-23T19:56:01Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614504
dc.descriptionClass of 2012 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: The goal of this project was to evaluate the use of a preparation of the brainstem and spinal cord of neonatal rats that has been widely used for observing and quantifying central nervous activity, as well as the response to pharmacological manipulation. To achieve this, we specifically aimed to remove the intact brainstem and spinal cord of newborn rats, and develop a preparation that would maintain physiological function and allow for recording of electrical activity. Methods: Multiple dissections were performed on neonatal rats. Conditions during the dissections were controlled to maintain physiological function. Once removed, the intact brainstem and spinal cord was placed in a preparation that allowed for manipulation and access to nerve rootlets. Finally, glass suction electrodes were used to record electrical activity directly from the nerve rootlets. Once recorded, the data were stored on a hard drive for further analysis. Main Results: We were successful in isolating the intact brainstem and spinal cord in neonatal rats while maintaining physiological conditions and nervous activity. The preparation allowed for easy access to nerve roots as well as customization for different experiments. We were also successful in recording nerve activity in the preparation and collection of data for use in future experiments Conclusions: We conclude that the brainstem spinal cord preparation described in this study is a valuable tool that allows for recording and analysis of nerve activity, and specifically for measurement of respiratory motor output. This is a preparation that can be used in a variety of experiments that attempt to observe or quantify the activity of central nerve cells and allows for pharmacological interventions that could be applied in various experiments.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectBrainstemen
dc.subjectSpinal Corden
dc.subjectNeonatal Raten
dc.subjectNicotineen
dc.subjectPrenatalen
dc.subject.meshBrain Stem
dc.subject.meshSpinal Cord
dc.subject.meshNicotine
dc.titleEvaluation of the Brainstem Spinal Cord Preparation in the Neonatal Rat as a Model for Prenatal Nicotine Exposureen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
html.description.abstractSpecific Aims: The goal of this project was to evaluate the use of a preparation of the brainstem and spinal cord of neonatal rats that has been widely used for observing and quantifying central nervous activity, as well as the response to pharmacological manipulation. To achieve this, we specifically aimed to remove the intact brainstem and spinal cord of newborn rats, and develop a preparation that would maintain physiological function and allow for recording of electrical activity. Methods: Multiple dissections were performed on neonatal rats. Conditions during the dissections were controlled to maintain physiological function. Once removed, the intact brainstem and spinal cord was placed in a preparation that allowed for manipulation and access to nerve rootlets. Finally, glass suction electrodes were used to record electrical activity directly from the nerve rootlets. Once recorded, the data were stored on a hard drive for further analysis. Main Results: We were successful in isolating the intact brainstem and spinal cord in neonatal rats while maintaining physiological conditions and nervous activity. The preparation allowed for easy access to nerve roots as well as customization for different experiments. We were also successful in recording nerve activity in the preparation and collection of data for use in future experiments Conclusions: We conclude that the brainstem spinal cord preparation described in this study is a valuable tool that allows for recording and analysis of nerve activity, and specifically for measurement of respiratory motor output. This is a preparation that can be used in a variety of experiments that attempt to observe or quantify the activity of central nerve cells and allows for pharmacological interventions that could be applied in various experiments.


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