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dc.contributor.advisorWarholak, Terrien
dc.contributor.advisorPhan, Hannaen
dc.contributor.authorDinh, Kim
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, MaiHuong
dc.contributor.authorBich, Ngoc
dc.contributor.authorWarholak, Terri
dc.contributor.authorPhan, Hanna
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-24T15:26:09Z
dc.date.available2016-06-24T15:26:09Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614603
dc.descriptionClass of 2011 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To determine the perceptions of a Vietnamese population provided medication counseling in Vietnamese and their understanding of the directions, the indication, side effects, and importance of adherence to their medications. They also rated the helpfulness of the counseling. METHODS: Vietnamese speaking pharmacists performed medication reviews with Vietnamese adults who self-identified their level of English proficiency. Participants rated the helpfulness of the reviews on understanding medication directions, indication, side effects, and importance of adherence. Demographic data also was collected. The questionnaires were administered after each “brown bag” session. RESULTS: Twenty-nine Vietnamese patients received counseling; all completed the questionnaire (no English proficiency = 8; some = 11; full proficiency = 10). Average number of years residence in the United States was 17.4 (SD = 9.6 years, range from 2 months to 35 years). Approximately half of the patients (44.8%) found having pharmacists who spoke Vietnamese to be the most helpful; 48.2% answered “both” language fluency and shared culture were most helpful. The service was rated “somewhat to very helpful” in understanding medication directions (93%), indication (86%), side effects (79%), and the importance of adherence (79%). CONCLUSION: Overall, subjects found medication review services helpful when provided in their native language, indicating the need for language-directed services to help non-English speaking patients understand their medications.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPerceptionsen
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.subjectVietnameseen
dc.subjectMedicationen
dc.subject.meshPatient Medication Knowledge
dc.subject.meshEducation
dc.subject.meshVietnam
dc.titlePatient Perceptions of Medication Education in a Vietnamese Community     en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To determine the perceptions of a Vietnamese population provided medication counseling in Vietnamese and their understanding of the directions, the indication, side effects, and importance of adherence to their medications. They also rated the helpfulness of the counseling. METHODS: Vietnamese speaking pharmacists performed medication reviews with Vietnamese adults who self-identified their level of English proficiency. Participants rated the helpfulness of the reviews on understanding medication directions, indication, side effects, and importance of adherence. Demographic data also was collected. The questionnaires were administered after each “brown bag” session. RESULTS: Twenty-nine Vietnamese patients received counseling; all completed the questionnaire (no English proficiency = 8; some = 11; full proficiency = 10). Average number of years residence in the United States was 17.4 (SD = 9.6 years, range from 2 months to 35 years). Approximately half of the patients (44.8%) found having pharmacists who spoke Vietnamese to be the most helpful; 48.2% answered “both” language fluency and shared culture were most helpful. The service was rated “somewhat to very helpful” in understanding medication directions (93%), indication (86%), side effects (79%), and the importance of adherence (79%). CONCLUSION: Overall, subjects found medication review services helpful when provided in their native language, indicating the need for language-directed services to help non-English speaking patients understand their medications.


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