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dc.contributor.authorPranschke, Stephanie
dc.contributor.authorMac Nish, Robert D.
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-08T00:18:18Z
dc.date.available2016-07-08T00:18:18Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/615799
dc.description.abstractThe desert climate of Southern Arizona coupled with the overdraft of its groundwater resources, led to the passing of the 1980, Groundwater Management Act. The Act mandates the creation of management plans in designated areas of heavy overdraft. Of the four initial Active Management Areas (AMAs, three had management plans that were designed to secure sustainable yield of the aquifer by 2025. In 1994, the Arizona legislature created a fifth AMA by designating the southern part of the Tucson AMA as the Santa Cruz AMA (SCAMA). The purpose for this subdivision was to facilitate the bi- national negotiations for coordinated water resource management in this internationally shared basin. Additionally, the SCAMA is to coordinate the management of surface water and groundwater rights for public health, safety and welfare. A.R.S. § 45-411.04. The legislature also assigned the SCAMA the management goals of maintaining safe -yield conditions and preventing long -term declines in local water table levels. A.R.S. § 45- 562(C) (ADWR, 1999). This study is a result of a grant award from the 1999 Augmentation and Conservation Assistance Program in an attempt to investigate the availability of additional water supplies and water storage areas within the SCAMA.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors would like to express their gratitude to Eric Handler who over the course of this project researched and was responsible for the contents of chapter 7. Thanks to his hard work, the legal and environmental chapter of this report was possible. Additional comments and suggestions were provided by Eric Holler of the Bureau of Reclamation and Mark Cross from Errol. L. Montgomery and Associates. This project was funded by a grant from the Santa Cruz Active Management Area of the Arizona Department of Water Resources (ADWR), Nogales, Arizona through the 1999 Augmentation and Conservation Assistance Program.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherDepartment of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTechnical Reports on Hydrology and Water Resources, No. 02-020en
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regentsen
dc.sourceProvided by the Department of Hydrology and Water Resources.en
dc.titleInvestigations into the availability of additional water supplies and water storage areas for the Santa Cruz active management area, Arizonaen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeTechnical Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Hydrology & Water Resources, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis title from the Hydrology & Water Resources Technical Reports collection is made available by the Department of Hydrology & Atmospheric Sciences and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. If you have questions about titles in this collection, please contact repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T14:29:50Z
html.description.abstractThe desert climate of Southern Arizona coupled with the overdraft of its groundwater resources, led to the passing of the 1980, Groundwater Management Act. The Act mandates the creation of management plans in designated areas of heavy overdraft. Of the four initial Active Management Areas (AMAs, three had management plans that were designed to secure sustainable yield of the aquifer by 2025. In 1994, the Arizona legislature created a fifth AMA by designating the southern part of the Tucson AMA as the Santa Cruz AMA (SCAMA). The purpose for this subdivision was to facilitate the bi- national negotiations for coordinated water resource management in this internationally shared basin. Additionally, the SCAMA is to coordinate the management of surface water and groundwater rights for public health, safety and welfare. A.R.S. § 45-411.04. The legislature also assigned the SCAMA the management goals of maintaining safe -yield conditions and preventing long -term declines in local water table levels. A.R.S. § 45- 562(C) (ADWR, 1999). This study is a result of a grant award from the 1999 Augmentation and Conservation Assistance Program in an attempt to investigate the availability of additional water supplies and water storage areas within the SCAMA.


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