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dc.contributor.authorBeatty, Norman
dc.contributor.authorMedina-Garcia, Luis
dc.contributor.authorAl Mohajer, Mayar
dc.contributor.authorZangeneh, Tirdad T.
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-15T01:20:39Z
dc.date.available2016-07-15T01:20:39Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationPolymicrobial Pituitary Abscess Predominately Involving Escherichia coli in the Setting of an Apoplectic Pituitary Prolactinoma 2016, 2016:1 Case Reports in Infectious Diseasesen
dc.identifier.issn2090-6625
dc.identifier.issn2090-6633
dc.identifier.doi10.1155/2016/4743212
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/617000
dc.description.abstractPituitary abscess is a rare intracranial infection that can be life-threatening if not appropriately diagnosed and treated upon presentation. The most common presenting symptoms include headache, anterior pituitary hypofunction, and visual field disturbances. Brain imaging with either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging usually reveals intra- or suprasellar lesion(s). Diagnosis is typically confirmed intra- or postoperatively when pathological analysis is done. Clinicians should immediately start empiric antibiotics and request a neurosurgical consult when pituitary abscess is suspected. Escherichia coli ( E. coli ) causing intracranial infections are not well understood and are uncommon in adults. We present an interesting case of an immunocompetent male with a history of hypogonadism presenting with worsening headache and acute right eye vision loss. He was found to have a polymicrobial pituitary abscess predominantly involving E.   coli in addition to Actinomyces odontolyticus and Prevotella melaninogenica in the setting of an apoplectic pituitary prolactinoma. The definitive etiology of this infection was not determined but an odontogenic process was suspected. A chronic third molar eruption and impaction in close proximity to the pituitary gland likely led to contiguous spread of opportunistic oral microorganisms allowing for a polymicrobial pituitary abscess formation.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHINDAWI PUBLISHING CORPen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.hindawi.com/journals/criid/2016/4743212/en
dc.rightsCopyright © 2016 Norman Beatty et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License.en
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titlePolymicrobial Pituitary Abscess Predominately Involving Escherichia coli in the Setting of an Apoplectic Pituitary Prolactinomaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Med, Dept Med, Div Infect Dis,Banner Univ Med Ctren
dc.identifier.journalCase Reports in Infectious Diseasesen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T14:33:06Z
html.description.abstractPituitary abscess is a rare intracranial infection that can be life-threatening if not appropriately diagnosed and treated upon presentation. The most common presenting symptoms include headache, anterior pituitary hypofunction, and visual field disturbances. Brain imaging with either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging usually reveals intra- or suprasellar lesion(s). Diagnosis is typically confirmed intra- or postoperatively when pathological analysis is done. Clinicians should immediately start empiric antibiotics and request a neurosurgical consult when pituitary abscess is suspected. Escherichia coli ( E. coli ) causing intracranial infections are not well understood and are uncommon in adults. We present an interesting case of an immunocompetent male with a history of hypogonadism presenting with worsening headache and acute right eye vision loss. He was found to have a polymicrobial pituitary abscess predominantly involving E.   coli in addition to Actinomyces odontolyticus and Prevotella melaninogenica in the setting of an apoplectic pituitary prolactinoma. The definitive etiology of this infection was not determined but an odontogenic process was suspected. A chronic third molar eruption and impaction in close proximity to the pituitary gland likely led to contiguous spread of opportunistic oral microorganisms allowing for a polymicrobial pituitary abscess formation.


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Copyright © 2016 Norman Beatty et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2016 Norman Beatty et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License.