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dc.contributor.authorBlanche, Pierre-Alexandre
dc.contributor.authorLynn, Brittany
dc.contributor.authorChurin, Dmitriy
dc.contributor.authorKieu, Khanh
dc.contributor.authorNorwood, Robert A
dc.contributor.authorPeyghambarian, Nasser
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-27T00:51:24Z
dc.date.available2016-08-27T00:51:24Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationDiffraction response of photorefractive polymers over nine orders of magnitude of pulse duration. 2016, 6:29027 Sci Repen
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.pmid27364998
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep29027
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/618978
dc.description.abstractThe development of a single mode fiber-based pulsed laser with variable pulse duration, energy, and repetition rate has enabled the characterization of photorefractive polymer (PRP) in a previously inaccessible regime located between millisecond and microsecond single pulse illumination. With the addition of CW and nanosecond pulse lasers, four wave mixing measurements covering 9 orders of magnitudes in pulse duration are reported. Reciprocity failure of the diffraction efficiency according to the pulse duration for a constant energy density is observed and attributed to multiple excitation, transport and trapping events of the charge carriers. However, for pulses shorter than 30 μs, the efficiency reaches a plateau where an increase in energy density no longer affects the efficiency. This plateau is due to the saturation of the charge generation at high peak power given the limited number of sensitizer sites. The same behavior is observed in two different types of devices composed of the same material but with or without a buffer layer covering one electrode, which confirm the origin of these mechanisms. This new type of measurement is especially important to optimize PRP for applications using short pulse duration.
dc.description.sponsorshipAFOSR [FA9550-10-1-0207]; National Science Foundation through CIAN NSF ERC [EEC-0812072]; Office of Naval Research [N00014-14-1-0505]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNATURE PUBLISHING GROUPen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/srep29027en
dc.rightsCopyright © 2016, The Author(s). This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleDiffraction response of photorefractive polymers over nine orders of magnitude of pulse duration.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Opt Scien
dc.identifier.journalScientific reportsen
dc.description.noteOpen Access Journalen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-24T18:45:26Z
html.description.abstractThe development of a single mode fiber-based pulsed laser with variable pulse duration, energy, and repetition rate has enabled the characterization of photorefractive polymer (PRP) in a previously inaccessible regime located between millisecond and microsecond single pulse illumination. With the addition of CW and nanosecond pulse lasers, four wave mixing measurements covering 9 orders of magnitudes in pulse duration are reported. Reciprocity failure of the diffraction efficiency according to the pulse duration for a constant energy density is observed and attributed to multiple excitation, transport and trapping events of the charge carriers. However, for pulses shorter than 30 μs, the efficiency reaches a plateau where an increase in energy density no longer affects the efficiency. This plateau is due to the saturation of the charge generation at high peak power given the limited number of sensitizer sites. The same behavior is observed in two different types of devices composed of the same material but with or without a buffer layer covering one electrode, which confirm the origin of these mechanisms. This new type of measurement is especially important to optimize PRP for applications using short pulse duration.


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Copyright © 2016, The Author(s). This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2016, The Author(s). This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.